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J Diabetes Investig. 2016 Jul;7(4):565-73. doi: 10.1111/jdi.12457. Epub 2016 Jan 23.

Combination therapy with liraglutide and insulin in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes: A 36-week, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group trial.

Author information

1
Kansai Electric Power Hospital, Osaka, Japan.
2
Takatsuki Red Cross Hospital, Osaka, Japan.
3
Wasakusa Clinic, Tochigi, Japan.
4
Naka Memorial Clinic, Ibaraki, Japan.
5
Shiraiwa Medical Clinic, Osaka, Japan.
6
Medical & Scientific Affairs Department, Novo Nordisk Pharma Ltd, Tokyo, Japan.
7
Medical and Science, GLP-1, Novo Nordisk A/S, Søborg, Denmark.
8
Department of Internal Medicine, Kawasaki Medical School, Okayama, Japan.

Abstract

AIMS/INTRODUCTION:

To assess efficacy and safety of liraglutide in combination with insulin compared with insulin monotherapy in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

This was a 36-week, multicenter, double-blind, parallel-group trial, where patients on stable insulin therapy (basal/premixed/basal-bolus) were randomized 1:1 to additional liraglutide 0.9 mg/day (n = 127) or placebo (n = 130). The insulin dose was fixed for 16 weeks, and titrated based on self-measured plasma glucose thereafter. The primary end-point was change in glycosylated hemoglobin after 16 weeks.

RESULTS:

Superiority of liraglutide plus insulin versus insulin monotherapy was confirmed based on estimated mean difference in glycosylated hemoglobin after 16 weeks of -1.30% (-14 mmol/mol; 95% confidence interval -1.47 to -1.13 [-16, -12]; P < 0.0001). Statistical significance was maintained to week 36. More patients on liraglutide achieved a glycosylated hemoglobin target of <7.0% (<53 mmol/mol) at week 16 (estimated odds ratio 50.57; 95% confidence interval 16.59 to 154.16; P < 0.0001). Improvements in seven-point self-measured plasma glucose and fasting plasma glucose were significantly greater with liraglutide than the placebo at week 16. Insulin dose after 36 weeks was lower with liraglutide than the placebo (estimated treatment ratio: 0.82 [95% confidence interval 0.76-0.90; P < 0.0001]). Occurrence of adverse events was similar in the two groups (85.8 and 81.5%, respectively); most were mild in severity. There were no significant differences in the number of hypoglycemic episodes during the 36 weeks.

CONCLUSIONS:

Adding liraglutide to insulin results in superior glycemic control compared with insulin alone in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes, and is generally well tolerated.

KEYWORDS:

Insulin; Liraglutide; Type 2 diabetes mellitus

PMID:
27182042
PMCID:
PMC4931207
DOI:
10.1111/jdi.12457
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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