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J Infect. 2016 Jul 5;72 Suppl:S98-S105. doi: 10.1016/j.jinf.2016.04.029. Epub 2016 May 12.

Systemic features of rotavirus infection.

Author information

1
Translational Pediatrics and Infectious Diseases, Department of Pediatrics, Hospital Clínico Universitario de Santiago de Compostela, Galicia, Spain; Genetics, Vaccines, Infections and Pediatrics Research Group (GENVIP), Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria de Santiago (IDIS), Hospital Clínico Universitario and Universidade de Santiago de Compostela (USC), Galicia, Spain.
2
Translational Pediatrics and Infectious Diseases, Department of Pediatrics, Hospital Clínico Universitario de Santiago de Compostela, Galicia, Spain; Genetics, Vaccines, Infections and Pediatrics Research Group (GENVIP), Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria de Santiago (IDIS), Hospital Clínico Universitario and Universidade de Santiago de Compostela (USC), Galicia, Spain. Electronic address: Federico.Martinon.Torres@sergas.es.

Abstract

A growing body of evidence warrants a revision of the received/conventional wisdom of rotavirus infection as synonymous with acute gastroenteritis. Rotavirus vaccines have boosted our interest and knowledge of this virus, but also importantly, they may have changed the landscape of the disease. Extraintestinal spread of rotavirus is well documented, and the clinical spectrum of the disease is widening. Furthermore, the positive impact of current rotavirus vaccines in reducing seizure hospitalization rates should prompt a reassessment of the actual burden of extraintestinal manifestations of rotavirus diseases. This article discusses current knowledge of the systemic extraintestinal manifestations of rotavirus infection and their underlying mechanisms, and aims to pave the way for future clinical, public health and research questions.

KEYWORDS:

Antigenemia; Extraintestinal spread; Rotaviremia; Rotavirus; Rotavirus vaccines

PMID:
27181101
DOI:
10.1016/j.jinf.2016.04.029
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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