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Am J Otolaryngol. 2016 May-Jun;37(3):210-6. doi: 10.1016/j.amjoto.2016.01.017. Epub 2016 Jan 25.

Resident fatigue in otolaryngology residents: a Web based survey.

Author information

1
Department of Otolaryngology and Communicative Sciences, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS, USA. Electronic address: anida@umc.edu.
2
University of Mississippi School of Medicine, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS, USA. Electronic address: bgooge@umc.edu.
3
Department of Otolaryngology and Communicative Sciences, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS, USA. Electronic address: AFLewis@umc.edu.
4
University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS, USA. Electronic address: WMay@umc.edu.

Abstract

IMPORTANCE:

Resident fatigue has become a point of emphasis in medical education and its effects on otolaryngology residents and their patients require further study.

OBJECTIVE:

The purpose of our study was to evaluate the prevalence and nature of fatigue in otolaryngology residents, evaluate various quality of life measures, and investigate associations of increased fatigue with resident safety.

STUDY DESIGN:

Anonymous survey.

SETTING:

Internet based.

PARTICIPANTS:

United States allopathic otolaryngology residents.

INTERVENTION:

None.

MAIN OUTCOME(S) AND MEASURES:

The survey topics included demographics, residency structure, sleep habits and perceived stress. Responses were correlated with a concurrent Epworth Sleep Scale questionnaire to evaluate effects of fatigue on resident training and quality of life.

RESULTS:

190 residents responded to the survey with 178 completing the Epworth Sleep Scale questionnaire. Results revealed a mean Epworth Sleep Scale score of 9.9±5.1 with a median of 10.0 indicating a significant number of otolaryngology residents are excessively sleepy. Statistically significant correlations between Epworth Sleep Scale and sex, region, hours of sleep, and work hours were found. Residents taking in-house call had significantly fewer hours of sleep compared to home call (p=0.01). Residents on "head and neck" (typically consisting of a large proportion of head and neck oncologic surgery) rotations tended to have higher Epworth Sleep Scale and had significantly fewer hours of sleep (p=.003) and greater work hours (p<.001). Additionally, residents who reported no needle stick type incidents or near motor vehicle accidents had significantly lower mean Epworth Sleep Scale scores. Only 37.6% of respondents approve of the most recent Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education work hour restrictions and 14% reported averaging greater than 80hours of work/week.

CONCLUSION AND RELEVANCE:

A substantial number of otolaryngology residents are excessively sleepy. Our data suggest that the effects of fatigue play a role in resident well-being and resident safety.

PMID:
27178510
DOI:
10.1016/j.amjoto.2016.01.017
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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