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J Am Assoc Lab Anim Sci. 2016;55(3):336-45.

Radiographic Morphometry of the Lumbar Spine in Munich Miniature Pigs.

Author information

1
Department of Anatomy, University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Foundation, Hanover, Germany; Heinrich-Heine University, Düsseldorf, Germany. Elisabeth.Engelke@tiho-hannover.de.
2
Central Unit for Animal Research and Animal Welfare Duties, Heinrich-Heine University, Düsseldorf, Germany.
3
Department of Anatomy, University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Foundation, Hanover, Germany; Heinrich-Heine University, Düsseldorf, Germany.
4
Department of Anatomy, University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Foundation, Hanover, Germany, Heinrich-Heine University, Düsseldorf, Germany.

Abstract

The incidence of human spinal column disease remains high, and animal models still play important roles in prophylactic, diagnostic, and therapeutic research. Because of their similar size to humans, pigs remain an important spine model. For pigs to serve as a model for the human spine, basic similarities and differences must be understood. In this study, morphometric data of the lumbar spine of Munich miniature pigs (Troll) were recorded radiologically, evaluated, and compared with recorded human data. Whereas humans have a constant number of 5 lumbar vertebrae, Munich minipigs had 5 or 6 lumbar vertebrae. Compared with their human counterparts, the lumbar vertebral bodies of the minipigs were remarkably larger in the craniocaudal (superior-inferior) direction and considerably smaller in the dorsoventral and laterolateral directions. The porcine vertebral canal was smaller than the human vertebral canal. The spinal cord extended into the caudal part of the porcine lumbar vertebral canal and thus did not terminate as cranial, as seen in humans. The lumbar intervertebral spaces of the pig were narrower in craniocaudal direction than human intervertebral spaces. These differences need to be considered when planning surgical actions, not only to avoid pain and irreversible damage to the minipigs but also to achieve accurate scientific results.

PMID:
27177570
PMCID:
PMC4865698
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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