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Neuroscience. 2016 Aug 4;329:122-33. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroscience.2016.05.003. Epub 2016 May 7.

NMDA receptors are involved in the antidepressant-like effects of capsaicin following amphetamine withdrawal in male mice.

Author information

1
Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, P.O. Box 13145-784, Tehran, Iran; Regenerative Medicine Program, Department of Biochemistry and Medical Genetics, College of Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.
2
Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Gonbad Kavous University, Gonbad Kavous, Iran.
3
Department of Neuroscience, School of Advanced Technologies in Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
4
Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, P.O. Box 13145-784, Tehran, Iran; Experimental Medicine Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, P.O. Box 13145-784, Tehran, Iran.
5
Department of Human Anatomy and Cell Science, College of Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, Canada.
6
Regenerative Medicine Program, Department of Biochemistry and Medical Genetics, College of Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.
7
Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, P.O. Box 13145-784, Tehran, Iran; School of Cognitive Sciences, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), Tehran, Iran; Iranian National Center for Addiction Studies, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Electronic address: zarinmr@ams.ac.ir.

Abstract

Amphetamine withdrawal (AW) is accompanied by diminished pleasure and depression which plays a key role in drug relapse and addictive behaviors. There is no efficient treatment for AW-induced depression and underpinning mechanisms were not well determined. Considering both transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily V, member 1 (TRPV1) and N-Methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors contribute to pathophysiology of mood and addictive disorders, in this study, we investigated the role of TRPV1 and NMDA receptors in mediating depressive-like behaviors following AW in male mice. Results revealed that administration of capsaicin, TRPV1 agonist, (100μg/mouse, i.c.v.) and MK-801, NMDA receptor antagonist (0.005mg/kg, i.p.) reversed AW-induced depressive-like behaviors in forced swimming test (FST) and splash test with no effect on animals' locomotion. Co-administration of sub-effective doses of MK-801 (0.001mg/kg, i.p.) and capsaicin (10μg/mouse, i.c.v) exerted antidepressant-like effects in behavioral tests. Capsazepine, TRPV1 antagonist, (100μg/mouse, i.c.v) and NMDA, NMDA receptor agonist (7.5mg/kg, i.p.) abolished the effects of capsaicin and MK-801, respectively. None of aforementioned treatments had any effect on behavior of control animals. Collectively, our findings showed that activation of TRPV1 and blockade of NMDA receptors produced antidepressant-like effects in male mice following AW, and these receptors are involved in AW-induced depressive-like behaviors. Further, we found that rapid antidepressant-like effects of capsaicin in FST and splash test are partly mediated by NMDA receptors.

KEYWORDS:

FST; NMDA receptors; TRPV1; amphetamine withdrawal; depression; splash test

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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