Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2016 May;39(4):252-62. doi: 10.1016/j.jmpt.2016.02.006.

Variations in Patterns of Utilization and Charges for the Care of Low Back Pain in North Carolina, 2000 to 2009: A Statewide Claims' Data Analysis.

Author information

1
Professor, Office of Public Health Studies, University of Hawai`i at Mānoa, Honolulu, HI. Electronic address: ehurwitz@hawaii.edu.
2
Associate Professor, Clinical and Translational Science Institute, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, NY.
3
Graduate Research Associate, Office of Public Health Studies, University of Hawaii at Mānoa, Honolulu, HI.
4
Associate Professor, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA.
5
Assistant Professor, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA.
6
Doctor of Chiropractic, Retired, Pocatello, ID.
7
Doctor of Chiropractic, Private Practice of Chiropractic, Wake Forest, NC.
8
Doctor of Chiropractic, Private practice of chiropractic, Greensboro, NC.
9
Doctor of Chiropractic, Private Practice of Chiropractic, Cary, NC.
10
Research Associate, Division of Epidemiology, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The purpose of the study was to compare utilization and charges generated by medical doctors (MD), doctors of chiropractic (DC) and physical therapists (PT) by patterns of care for the treatment of low back pain in North Carolina.

METHODS:

This was an analysis of low-back-pain-related closed claim data from the North Carolina State Health Plan for Teachers and State Employees from 2000 to 2009. Data were extracted from Blue Cross Blue Shield of North Carolina for the North Carolina State Health Plan using International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision diagnostic codes for uncomplicated low back pain (ULBP) and complicated low back pain (CLBP).

RESULTS:

Care patterns with single-provider types and no referrals incurred the least charges on average for both ULBP and CLBP. When care did not include referral providers or services, for ULBP, MD and DC care was on average $465 less than MD and PT care. For CLBP, MD and DC care averaged $965 more than MD and PT care. However, when care involved referral providers or services, MD and DC care was on average $1600 less when compared to MD and PT care for ULBP and $1885 less for CLBP. Risk-adjusted charges (available 2006-2009) for patients in the middle quintile of risk were significantly less for DC care patterns.

CONCLUSIONS:

Chiropractic care alone or DC with MD care incurred appreciably fewer charges for ULBP than MD care with or without PT care. This finding was reversed for CLBP. Adjusted charges for both ULBP and CLBP patients were significantly lower for DC patients.

KEYWORDS:

Chiropractic; Health Services; Healthcare Costs; Low Back Pain; Medical Care; Utilization

PMID:
27166406
DOI:
10.1016/j.jmpt.2016.02.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center