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Sci Data. 2016 May 10;3:160028. doi: 10.1038/sdata.2016.28.

MycoDB, a global database of plant response to mycorrhizal fungi.

Author information

1
Department of Environmental Science and Studies, DePaul University, Chicago, Illinois 60614, USA.
2
National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-3410, USA.
3
Department of Biology, University of Mississippi, University, Mississippi 38677, USA.
4
School of Forestry, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, Arizona 86011, USA.
5
Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas 66045, USA.
6
Colorado Forest Restoration Institute, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523-1472, USA.
7
Department of Biological Sciences, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, Arizona 86011, USA.
8
Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405, USA.
9
Departamento de Ciencias de la Vida, Universidad de las Fuerzas Armadas-ESPE, Sangolquí 1715231B, Ecuador.
10
US Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response, Washington DC 20004, USA.
11
Université Toulouse 3 Paul Sabatier, CNRS, ENFA; UMR5174 EDB (Évolution &Diversité Biologique); F-31062 Toulouse, France.
12
Department of Biology, University of British Columbia Okanagan, Kelowna BC, Canada V1V1V7.
13
College of Forestry, Beijing Forestry University, Beijing 100083, China.
14
School of Earth Sciences and Environmental Sustainability, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff Arizona 86011, USA.
15
Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Science, King Mongkut's University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok 10140, Thailand.
16
Department of Renewable Resources, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada T6G 2E3.
17
Department of Biology, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah 84602, USA.
18
School of Forest Resources and Environmental Science, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, Michigan 49931-1295, USA.
19
Institute of Ecology and Evolution, University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon 97403, USA.
20
Department of Land Resources and Environmental Sciences, Montana State University, Bozeman, Montana 59717, USA.
21
Department of Biology, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, New Mexico 88003, USA.
22
Department of Ecosystem Science and Sustainability, and the Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523, USA.
23
Department of Plant Biology, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602, USA.
24
Department of Forest and Conservation Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V6T 1Z4.
25
Department of Biological Sciences, Winston Salem State University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27110, USA.
26
Department of Biology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599, USA.
27
Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychology, Maastricht University, 6200 MD Maastricht, The Netherlands.
28
Software Engineering, Enova International Inc., Chicago, Illinois 60604, USA.
29
Department of Natural Resource Ecology and Management, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078, USA.
30
Department of Biology, California State University-Northridge, Northridge, California 91330, USA.

Abstract

Plants form belowground associations with mycorrhizal fungi in one of the most common symbioses on Earth. However, few large-scale generalizations exist for the structure and function of mycorrhizal symbioses, as the nature of this relationship varies from mutualistic to parasitic and is largely context-dependent. We announce the public release of MycoDB, a database of 4,010 studies (from 438 unique publications) to aid in multi-factor meta-analyses elucidating the ecological and evolutionary context in which mycorrhizal fungi alter plant productivity. Over 10 years with nearly 80 collaborators, we compiled data on the response of plant biomass to mycorrhizal fungal inoculation, including meta-analysis metrics and 24 additional explanatory variables that describe the biotic and abiotic context of each study. We also include phylogenetic trees for all plants and fungi in the database. To our knowledge, MycoDB is the largest ecological meta-analysis database. We aim to share these data to highlight significant gaps in mycorrhizal research and encourage synthesis to explore the ecological and evolutionary generalities that govern mycorrhizal functioning in ecosystems.

PMID:
27163938
PMCID:
PMC4862322
DOI:
10.1038/sdata.2016.28
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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