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Am J Infect Control. 2016 Nov 1;44(11):1350-1355. doi: 10.1016/j.ajic.2016.03.013. Epub 2016 May 6.

Determining high touch areas in the operating room with levels of contamination.

Author information

1
University of Colorado Hospital, Centennial, CO. Electronic address: Tlink612@yahoo.com.
2
Melius Solutions, Ann Arbor, MI.
3
University of Colorado Hospital, Centennial, CO.
4
College of Nursing, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention put forth the recommendation to clean areas considered high touch more frequently than minimal touch surfaces. The operating room was not included in these recommendations. The purpose of this study was to determine the most frequently touched surfaces in the operating room and their level of contamination.

METHODS:

Phase 1 was a descriptive study to identify high touch areas in the operating room. In phase 2, high touch areas determined in phase 1 were cultured to determine if high touch areas observed were also highly contaminated and if they were more contaminated than a low touch surface.

RESULTS:

The 5 primary high touch surfaces in order were the anesthesia computer mouse, OR bed, nurse computer mouse, OR door, and anesthesia medical cart. Using the OR light as a control, this study demonstrated that a low touch area was less contaminated than the high touch areas with the exception of the OR bed.

CONCLUSIONS:

Based on information and data collected in this study, it is recommended that an enhanced cleaning protocol be established based on the most frequently touched surfaces in the operating room.

KEYWORDS:

Environmental surfaces; contaminated hands; environmental cleaning; environmental cultures; environmental surveillance; high touch areas; high touch surfaces; operating room; procedure rooms

PMID:
27160980
DOI:
10.1016/j.ajic.2016.03.013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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