Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Adv Drug Deliv Rev. 2016 Oct 1;105(Pt A):44-54. doi: 10.1016/j.addr.2016.04.032. Epub 2016 May 5.

Microbiome therapeutics - Advances and challenges.

Author information

1
MIT Microbiology Program, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA, USA; MIT Synthetic Biology Center, 500 Technology Square, Cambridge, MA, USA; The Center for Microbiome Informatics and Therapeutics, Cambridge, MA, USA.
2
MIT Microbiology Program, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA, USA; MIT Synthetic Biology Center, 500 Technology Square, Cambridge, MA, USA; Department of Biological Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA; Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA; The Center for Microbiome Informatics and Therapeutics, Cambridge, MA, USA. Electronic address: timlu@mit.edu.

Abstract

The microbial community that lives on and in the human body exerts a major impact on human health, from metabolism to immunity. In order to leverage the close associations between microbes and their host, development of therapeutics targeting the microbiota has surged in recent years. Here, we discuss current additive and subtractive strategies to manipulate the microbiota, focusing on bacteria engineered to produce therapeutic payloads, consortia of natural organisms and selective antimicrobials. Further, we present challenges faced by the community in the development of microbiome therapeutics, including designing microbial therapies that are adapted for specific geographies in the body, stable colonization with microbial therapies, discovery of clinically relevant biosensors, robustness of engineered synthetic gene circuits and addressing safety and biocontainment concerns. Moving forward, collaboration between basic and applied researchers and clinicians to address these challenges will poise the field to herald an age of next-generation, cellular therapies that draw on novel findings in basic research to inform directed augmentation of the human microbiota.

KEYWORDS:

Bacteriophage; Host-bacteria interactions; Microbial ecology; Microbiome; Synthetic biology

PMID:
27158095
PMCID:
PMC5093770
DOI:
10.1016/j.addr.2016.04.032
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center