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J Hazard Mater. 2017 Feb 5;323(Pt A):177-183. doi: 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2016.03.028. Epub 2016 Mar 11.

Association of birth outcomes with fetal exposure to parabens, triclosan and triclocarban in an immigrant population in Brooklyn, New York.

Author information

1
Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, State University of New York, Downstate School of Public Health, BOX 43, 450 Clarkson Ave., Brooklyn, NY, USA. Electronic address: laura.geer@downstate.edu.
2
Center for Environmental Security, The Biodesign Institute, Global Security Initiative, and School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment, Arizona State University, 781 East Terrace Mall, Tempe, AZ 85287, USA.
3
Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, State University of New York, Downstate School of Public Health, BOX 43, 450 Clarkson Ave., Brooklyn, NY, USA.
4
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, State University of New York Downstate Medical Center, 445 Lenox Road, Brooklyn, NY, USA.
5
Center for Environmental Security, The Biodesign Institute, Global Security Initiative, and School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment, Arizona State University, 781 East Terrace Mall, Tempe, AZ 85287, USA; Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, 615 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Prior studies suggest associations between fetal exposure to antimicrobial and paraben compounds with adverse reproductive outcomes, mainly in animal models. We have previously reported elevated levels of these compounds for a cohort of mothers and neonates.

OBJECTIVE:

We examined the relationship between human exposure to parabens and antimicrobial compounds and birth outcomes including birth weight, body length and head size, and gestational age at birth.

METHODS:

Maternal third trimester urinary and umbilical cord blood plasma concentrations of methylparaben (MePB), ethylparaben (EtPB), propylparaben (PrPB), butylparaben (BuPB), benzylparaben (BePB), triclosan (2,4,4'-trichloro-2'-hydroxydiphenyl ether or TCS) and triclocarban (1-(4-chlorophenyl)-3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl) urea or TCC), were measured in 185 mothers and 34 paired singleton neonates in New York, 2007-2009.

RESULTS:

In regression models adjusting for confounders, adverse exposure-outcome associations observed included increased odds of PTB (BuPB), decreased gestational age at birth (BuPB and TCC) and birth weight (BuPB), decreased body length (PrPB) and protective effects on PTB (BePB) and LBW (3'-Cl-TCC) (p<0.05). No associations were observed for MePB, EtPB, or TCS.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study provides the first evidence of associations between antimicrobials and potential adverse birth outcomes in neonates. Findings are consistent with animal data suggesting endocrine-disrupting potential resulting in developmental and reproductive toxicity.

KEYWORDS:

Antimicrobials; Birth outcomes; Exposure; Parabens

PMID:
27156397
PMCID:
PMC5018415
DOI:
10.1016/j.jhazmat.2016.03.028
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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