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Biosens Bioelectron. 2016 Nov 15;85:103-109. doi: 10.1016/j.bios.2016.04.063. Epub 2016 Apr 21.

Inexpensive and fast pathogenic bacteria screening using field-effect transistors.

Author information

1
Department of Electronic & Electrical Engineering, University of Bath, Bath BA2 7AY, United Kingdom. Electronic address: n.f@hotmail.it.
2
Department of Electronic & Electrical Engineering, University of Bath, Bath BA2 7AY, United Kingdom. Electronic address: nikhilbhalla151@gmail.com.
3
School of Chemistry & Manchester Institute of Biotechnology, The University of Manchester, Manchester M1 7DN, United Kingdom.
4
School of Chemistry & Manchester Institute of Biotechnology, The University of Manchester, Manchester M1 7DN, United Kingdom. Electronic address: juana.reyesmartinez@manchester.ac.uk.
5
School of Chemistry & Manchester Institute of Biotechnology, The University of Manchester, Manchester M1 7DN, United Kingdom. Electronic address: amrita.sarkar@manchester.ac.uk.
6
Department of Biology & Biochemistry, University of Bath, Bath BA2 7AY, United Kingdom. Electronic address: maisemlaabei27@gmail.com.
7
Department of Electronic & Electrical Engineering, University of Bath, Bath BA2 7AY, United Kingdom. Electronic address: p.jolly@bath.ac.uk.
8
Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Bath, Bath BA2 7AY, United Kingdom. Electronic address: c.r.bowen@bath.ac.uk.
9
Department of Electronic & Electrical Engineering, University of Bath, Bath BA2 7AY, United Kingdom. Electronic address: j.t.taylor@bath.ac.uk.
10
School of Chemistry & Manchester Institute of Biotechnology, The University of Manchester, Manchester M1 7DN, United Kingdom. Electronic address: sabine.flitsch@manchester.ac.uk.
11
Department of Electronic & Electrical Engineering, University of Bath, Bath BA2 7AY, United Kingdom. Electronic address: p.estrela@bath.ac.uk.

Abstract

While pathogenic bacteria contribute to a large number of globally important diseases and infections, current clinical diagnosis is based on processes that often involve culturing which can be time-consuming. Therefore, innovative, simple, rapid and low-cost solutions to effectively reduce the burden of bacterial infections are urgently needed. Here we demonstrate a label-free sensor for fast bacterial detection based on metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs). The electric charge of bacteria binding to the glycosylated gates of a MOSFET enables quantification in a straightforward manner. We show that the limit of quantitation is 1.9×10(5) CFU/mL with this simple device, which is more than 10,000-times lower than is achieved with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-ToF) on the same modified surfaces. Moreover, the measurements are extremely fast and the sensor can be mass produced at trivial cost as a tool for initial screening of pathogens.

KEYWORDS:

Bacteria; BioFET; Biosensors; Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy; MALDI-ToF

PMID:
27156019
DOI:
10.1016/j.bios.2016.04.063
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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