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Intensive Care Med. 2016 Sep;42(9):1350-9. doi: 10.1007/s00134-016-4375-7. Epub 2016 May 7.

Less invasive hemodynamic monitoring in critically ill patients.

Author information

1
Service de réanimation médicale, Hôpital de Bicêtre, Hôpitaux universitaires Paris-Sud, AP-HP, 78, rue du Général Leclerc, 94 270, Le Kremlin-Bicêtre, France. jean-louis.teboul@aphp.fr.
2
Department of Anesthesiology, Center of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, 20246, Hamburg, Germany.
3
Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, St George's Hospital and Medical School, London, UK.
4
Department of Intensive Care, CHIREC Hospitals (Université Libre de Bruxelles), Brussels, Belgium.
5
Department of Transversal Medicine, Institute of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Triemli City Hospital, Zurich, Switzerland.
6
Service de réanimation médicale, Hôpital de Bicêtre, Hôpitaux universitaires Paris-Sud, AP-HP, 78, rue du Général Leclerc, 94 270, Le Kremlin-Bicêtre, France.
7
Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.
8
Department of Critical Care Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, 15261, USA.
9
Clinique Ambroise Paré, 92200, Neuilly-Sur-Seine, France.
10
Department of Intensive Care, Erasme University Hospital, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium.
11
Department of Anesthesiology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.

Abstract

Over the last decade, the way to monitor hemodynamics at the bedside has evolved considerably in the intensive care unit as well as in the operating room. The most important evolution has been the declining use of the pulmonary artery catheter along with the growing use of echocardiography and of continuous, real-time, minimally or totally non-invasive hemodynamic monitoring techniques. This article, which is the result of an agreement between authors belonging to the Cardiovascular Dynamics Section of the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine, discusses the advantages and limits of using such techniques with an emphasis on their respective place in the hemodynamic management of critically ill patients with hemodynamic instability.

KEYWORDS:

Bioreactance; Esophageal Doppler; Hemodynamic monitoring; Pulse contour analysis; Pulse pressure variation; Transpulmonary thermodilution

PMID:
27155605
DOI:
10.1007/s00134-016-4375-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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