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Eur J Cancer. 2016 Jul;61:77-84. doi: 10.1016/j.ejca.2016.03.085. Epub 2016 May 4.

Systems immune monitoring in cancer therapy.

Author information

1
Department of Pathology, Microbiology, and Immunology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, USA; Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA.
2
Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, USA.
3
Department of Pathology, Microbiology, and Immunology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, USA; Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA. Electronic address: jonathan.irish@vanderbilt.edu.

Abstract

Treatments that successfully modulate anti-cancer immunity have significantly improved outcomes for advanced stage malignancies and sparked intense study of the cellular mechanisms governing therapy response and resistance. These responses are governed by an evolving milieu of cancer and immune cell subpopulations that can be a rich source of biomarkers and biological insight, but it is only recently that research tools have developed to comprehensively characterize this level of cellular complexity. Mass cytometry is particularly well suited to tracking cells in complex tissues because >35 measurements can be made on each of hundreds of thousands of cells per sample, allowing all cells detected in a sample to be characterized for cell type, signalling activity, and functional outcome. This review focuses on mass cytometry as an example of systems level characterization of cancer and immune cells in human tissues, including blood, bone marrow, lymph nodes, and primary tumours. This review also discusses the state of the art in single cell tumour immunology, including tissue collection, technical and biological quality controls, computational analysis, and integration of different experimental and clinical data types. Ex vivo analysis of human tumour cells complements both in vivo monitoring, which generally measures far fewer features or lacks single cell resolution, and laboratory models, which incur cell type losses, signalling alterations, and genomic changes during establishment. Mass cytometry is on the leading edge of a new generation of cytomic tools that work with small tissue samples, such as a fine needle aspirates or blood draws, to monitor changes in rare or unexpected cell subsets during cancer therapy. This approach holds great promise for dissecting cellular microenvironments, monitoring how treatments affect tissues, revealing cellular biomarkers and effector mechanisms, and creating new treatments that productively engage the immune system to fight cancer and other diseases.

KEYWORDS:

Human immune monitoring; Immunotherapy; Mass cytometry; Systems immunology; Tumour immunology

PMID:
27155446
PMCID:
PMC4885747
DOI:
10.1016/j.ejca.2016.03.085
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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