Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Clin Endocrinol (Oxf). 2016 Oct;85(4):535-43. doi: 10.1111/cen.13097. Epub 2016 Jun 2.

Vitamin D treatment in Somali women living in Sweden - Two randomized, placebo-controlled studies.

Author information

1
Department of Dermatology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, at Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. Amra.Osmancevic@vgregion.se.
2
Hjällbo Primary Health Care, Gothenburg, Sweden.
3
Department of Dermatology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, at Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
4
Brämhult Primary Health Care, Borås, Sweden.
5
Department of Geriatric Medicine, Södra Älvsborgs Hospital, Borås, Sweden.
6
Cleopatra Medical Centre, Gothenburg, Sweden.
7
Section for Endocrinology, Institution of Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital at Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

There is limited information about the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and the effects of treatment on immigrants. The effects of oral vitamin D intake and UVB treatment on vitamin D status in healthy Somali women living in Sweden were analysed.

DESIGN:

Two studies were carried out; a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, with oral drops of 800 IU and 1600 IU cholecalciferol and similar amounts of placebo given daily during 12 weeks and a single-blind, placebo-controlled study, using UVB (4·3-8·7 J/cm(2) ) or Woods lamp (placebo) on the upper body, or the face and hands.

PATIENTS:

One-hundred fourteen Somali women, mean age 34 years, latitude 0-10°N, living in Sweden >2 years, latitude 57°N, participated.

MEASUREMENTS:

Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (S-25(OH)D) was monitored before, every 6 weeks and at 3 months after treatment.

RESULTS:

The majority of the women (n = 83, 73%) were vitamin D-deficient, S-25(OH)D < 25 nmol/l at start. There was a dose-dependent increase in S-25(OH)D levels (P = 0·001, stratified Jonckheere-Terpstra test) with a mean increase after twelve weeks in women treated with 800 IU/day and women treated with 1600 IU/day of 18 nmol/l (95% CI: 6-29, median = 17) and 29 nmol/l (95% CI: 17-42, median = 34), respectively. S-25(OH)D decreased during follow-up but remained above baseline levels. The placebo group remained unchanged throughout the study. UVB treatment increased S-25(OH)D dose-dependently after 6 weeks (P = 0·03, Jonckheere-Terpstra test).

CONCLUSIONS:

Vitamin D deficiency was common in immigrants living at higher latitudes. Vitamin D treatment increased S-25(OH)D levels dose-dependently during 3 months. The effect was maintained for another 3 months. At least 1600 IU/day is recommended. The dropout rate was high.

PMID:
27155232
DOI:
10.1111/cen.13097
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley
Loading ...
Support Center