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Phys Med Rehabil Clin N Am. 2016 May;27(2):373-93. doi: 10.1016/j.pmr.2016.01.003.

The Molecular Pathophysiology of Concussive Brain Injury - an Update.

Author information

1
Pacific Pituitary Disorders Center, John Wayne Cancer Institute, Providence Saint John's Health Center, 2200 Santa Monica Boulevard, Santa Monica, CA 90404, USA. Electronic address: barkhoudariang@jwci.org.
2
Interdepartmental Program for Neuroscience, Department of Neurosurgery, UCLA Brain Injury Research Center, Semel Institute, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Room 18-228A, 10833 Le Conte Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA; Interdepartmental Program for Neuroscience, Department of Medical and Molecular Pharmacology, UCLA Brain Injury Research Center, Semel Institute, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Room 18-228A, 10833 Le Conte Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA.
3
Interdepartmental Programs for Neuroscience and Biomedical Engineering, Department of Neurosurgery, UCLA Brain Injury Research Center, Semel Institute, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Mattel Children's Hospital - UCLA, Room 18-218B, 10833 Le Conte Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA; Interdepartmental Programs for Neuroscience and Biomedical Engineering, Division of Pediatric Neurology, Department of Pediatrics, UCLA Brain Injury Research Center, Semel Institute, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Mattel Children's Hospital - UCLA, Room 18-218B, 10833 Le Conte Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA.

Abstract

Concussion, or mild traumatic brain injury (TBI), affects millions of patients worldwide. Understanding the pathophysiology of TBI can help manage its repercussions. The brain is significantly altered immediately following mild TBI because of metabolic, hemodynamic, structural, and electrophysiologic changes. This process affects cognition and behavior and can leave the brain vulnerable for worse injury in the setting of repeat insult. This article is an update of our previously published review, reporting relevant and current studies from the bench to the bedside of mild TBI. Understanding the pathobiology can help prevent and treat mild TBI.

KEYWORDS:

Concussion; Molecular mechanisms; Pathophysiology; Traumatic brain injury

PMID:
27154851
DOI:
10.1016/j.pmr.2016.01.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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