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Molecules. 2016 May 3;21(5). pii: E586. doi: 10.3390/molecules21050586.

Soy Isoflavones Regulate Lipid Metabolism through an AKT/mTORC1 Pathway in Diet-Induced Obesity (DIO) Male Rats.

Huang C1,2, Pang D3, Luo Q4,5, Chen X6,7, Gao Q8,9, Shi L10,11, Liu W12,13, Zou Y14, Li L15, Chen Z16,17.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Experimental Animal Disease Model, College of Veterinary Medicine, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, China. huangchao@sicau.edu.cn.
2
Key Laboratory of Animal Disease and Human Health of Sichuan Province, College of Veterinary Medicine, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, China. huangchao@sicau.edu.cn.
3
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, West China School of Preclinical and Forensic Medicine, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, China. pangdejiang@gmail.com.
4
Laboratory of Experimental Animal Disease Model, College of Veterinary Medicine, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, China. lqhbiology@163.com.
5
Key Laboratory of Animal Disease and Human Health of Sichuan Province, College of Veterinary Medicine, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, China. lqhbiology@163.com.
6
Laboratory of Experimental Animal Disease Model, College of Veterinary Medicine, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, China. chenxl3984@163.com.
7
Key Laboratory of Animal Disease and Human Health of Sichuan Province, College of Veterinary Medicine, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, China. chenxl3984@163.com.
8
Laboratory of Experimental Animal Disease Model, College of Veterinary Medicine, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, China. gaoqi12@126.com.
9
Key Laboratory of Animal Disease and Human Health of Sichuan Province, College of Veterinary Medicine, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, China. gaoqi12@126.com.
10
Laboratory of Experimental Animal Disease Model, College of Veterinary Medicine, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, China. shiliangqin87@163.com.
11
Key Laboratory of Animal Disease and Human Health of Sichuan Province, College of Veterinary Medicine, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, China. shiliangqin87@163.com.
12
Laboratory of Experimental Animal Disease Model, College of Veterinary Medicine, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, China. liuwt1986@126.com.
13
Key Laboratory of Animal Disease and Human Health of Sichuan Province, College of Veterinary Medicine, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, China. liuwt1986@126.com.
14
Natural Medicine Research Center, College of Veterinary Medicine, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, China. yuanfengzou@sicau.edu.cn.
15
Natural Medicine Research Center, College of Veterinary Medicine, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, China. lilixia905@163.com.
16
Laboratory of Experimental Animal Disease Model, College of Veterinary Medicine, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, China. chzhli75@163.com.
17
Key Laboratory of Animal Disease and Human Health of Sichuan Province, College of Veterinary Medicine, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, China. chzhli75@163.com.

Abstract

The pandemic tendency of obesity and its strong association with serious co-morbidities have elicited interest in the underlying mechanisms of these pathologies. Lipid homeostasis, closely involved in obesity, has been reported to be regulated by multiple pathways. mTORC1 is emerging as a critical regulator of lipid metabolism. Here, we describe that the consumption of soy isoflavones, with a structural similarity to that of estradiol, could mitigate obesity through an AKT/mTORC1 pathway. Fed with soy isoflavones, the diet-induced obesity (DIO) male rats exhibited decreased body weight, accompanied with suppressed lipogenesis and adipogenesis, as well as enhanced lipolysis and β‑oxidation. The phosphorylation of AKT and S6 were decreased after soy isoflavone treatment in vivo and in vitro, suggesting an inhibition effect of soy isoflavones on mTORC1 activity. Our study reveals a potential mechanism of soy isoflavones regulating lipid homeostasis, which will be important for obesity treatment.

KEYWORDS:

lipid metabolism; mTORC1; obesity; soy isoflavones

PMID:
27153053
DOI:
10.3390/molecules21050586
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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