Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Oncologist. 2016 Jun;21(6):684-91. doi: 10.1634/theoncologist.2016-0030. Epub 2016 May 5.

Comprehensive Genomic Profiling Facilitates Implementation of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network Guidelines for Lung Cancer Biomarker Testing and Identifies Patients Who May Benefit From Enrollment in Mechanism-Driven Clinical Trials.

Author information

1
Foundation Medicine, Inc., Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA jsuh@foundationmedicine.com.
2
Foundation Medicine, Inc., Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA.
3
Foundation Medicine, Inc., Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA Zhejiang Cancer Hospital, Hangzhou, People's Republic of China.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines for patients with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) recommend testing for EGFR, BRAF, ERBB2, and MET mutations; ALK, ROS1, and RET rearrangements; and MET amplification. We investigated the feasibility and utility of comprehensive genomic profiling (CGP), a hybrid capture-based next-generation sequencing (NGS) test, in clinical practice.

METHODS:

CGP was performed to a mean coverage depth of 576× on 6,832 consecutive cases of NSCLC (2012-2015). Genomic alterations (GAs) (point mutations, small indels, copy number changes, and rearrangements) involving EGFR, ALK, BRAF, ERBB2, MET, ROS1, RET, and KRAS were recorded. We also evaluated lung adenocarcinoma (AD) cases without GAs, involving these eight genes.

RESULTS:

The median age of the patients was 64 years (range: 13-88 years) and 53% were female. Among the patients studied, 4,876 (71%) harbored at least one GA involving EGFR (20%), ALK (4.1%), BRAF (5.7%), ERBB2 (6.0%), MET (5.6%), ROS1 (1.5%), RET (2.4%), or KRAS (32%). In the remaining cohort of lung AD without these known drivers, 273 cancer-related genes were altered in at least 0.1% of cases, including STK11 (21%), NF1 (13%), MYC (9.8%), RICTOR (6.4%), PIK3CA (5.4%), CDK4 (4.3%), CCND1 (4.0%), BRCA2 (2.5%), NRAS (2.3%), BRCA1 (1.7%), MAP2K1 (1.2%), HRAS (0.7%), NTRK1 (0.7%), and NTRK3 (0.2%).

CONCLUSION:

CGP is practical and facilitates implementation of the NCCN guidelines for NSCLC by enabling simultaneous detection of GAs involving all seven driver oncogenes and KRAS. Furthermore, without additional tissue use or cost, CGP identifies patients with "pan-negative" lung AD who may benefit from enrollment in mechanism-driven clinical trials.

IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE:

National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines for patients with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) recommend testing for several genomic alterations (GAs). The feasibility and utility of comprehensive genomic profiling were studied in NSCLC and in lung adenocarcinoma (AD) without GAs. Of patients with NSCLC, 71% harbored at least one GA to a gene listed in the guidelines or KRAS; 273 cancer-related genes were altered in at least 0.1% of the AD cases. Although logistical and administrative hurdles limit the widespread use of next-generation sequencing, the data confirm the feasibility and potential utility of comprehensive genomic profiling in clinical practice.

KEYWORDS:

Clinical trials; Comprehensive genomic profiling; National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines; Non-small cell lung cancer

PMID:
27151654
PMCID:
PMC4912374
DOI:
10.1634/theoncologist.2016-0030
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center