Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Cardiovasc Diabetol. 2016 May 5;15:74. doi: 10.1186/s12933-016-0392-7.

The prevalence of diabetes, hypertension and obesity among immigrants from East Africa and the former Soviet Union: a retrospective comparative 30-year cohort study.

Author information

1
Division of Community Health, Department of Family Medicine and Siaal Research Center for Family Medicine and Primary Care, Faculty of Health Science, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, PO Box 653, 84150, Beer-sheva, Israel. yonatanr@post.bgu.ac.il.
2
Division of Community Health, Department of Family Medicine and Siaal Research Center for Family Medicine and Primary Care, Faculty of Health Science, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, PO Box 653, 84150, Beer-sheva, Israel.
3
Hospital Division, Clalit Health Services, Tel Aviv, Israel.
4
Southern District, Clalit Health Services, Beer-sheva, Israel.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Previous studies have reported an increasing prevalence of metabolic abnormalities in immigrants who moved from low-cardiovascular-risk regions to Western countries, but little is known about time trends following immigration.

METHODS:

A retrospective cohort study of immigrants from Ethiopia in east Africa (EAI), the former Soviet Union (FSUI) and native-born Israelis (NBI) over a 35-year period. EAI were divided into three groups by date of immigration. Associations between ethnicity, age, sex and metabolic risk factors were assessed using logistic regression models.

RESULTS:

The study included 58,901 individuals (20,768 EAI, 20,507 FSUI, and 17,626 NBI). The multivariate odds ratios (OR) for diabetes were 2.4 (95 % CI 2.1-2.6), 2.1 (95 % CI 1.9-2.2) and 1.5 (95 % CI 1.3-1.7), respectively, for the three waves of EAI immigrations (P < 0.001 for trend) and 1.1 (95 % CI 0.9-1.2) for FSUI. For hypertension, the corresponding ORs were 1.8 (95 % CI 1.6-1.9), 1.4 (95 % CI 1.3-1.5), and 1.1 (95 % CI 0.9-1.2), respectively (P < 0.001) for EAI, and 2.1 (95 % CI 1.9-2.2) for FSUI. For obesity the ORs were -0.5 (95 % CI 0.4-0.6), 0.5 (95 % CI 0.4-0.6), and 0.3 (95 % CI 0.2-0.3), respectively (P < 0.001) for EAI, and 1.2 (95 % CI 1.1-1.3) for FSUI. The prevalence of diabetes in NBI with a BMI of 30 was identical to a BMI of 23.4 for EAI and 28.9 for FSUI.

CONCLUSIONS:

The prevalence of diabetes and hypertension was higher in EAI and increased over the years, despite a lower prevalence of obesity. It exceeded the prevalence rates in NBI.

KEYWORDS:

Body-mass index; Cardiovascular-risk factors; Diabetes; East African immigrants; Ethiopian immigrants; Ethnicity; Former Soviet Union immigrants

PMID:
27151384
PMCID:
PMC4858852
DOI:
10.1186/s12933-016-0392-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for BioMed Central Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center