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Infect Ecol Epidemiol. 2016 May 4;6:31658. doi: 10.3402/iee.v6.31658. eCollection 2016.

The equine Hendra virus vaccine remains a highly effective preventative measure against infection in horses and humans: 'The imperative to develop a human vaccine for the Hendra virus in Australia'.

Author information

1
Environmental Futures Research Institute, Griffith University, Nathan, QLD, Australia.
2
EcoHealth Alliance, New York, NY, USA.
3
Australian Veterinary Association Representative, Queensland Government Hendra virus Interagency Technical Working Group, Brisbane, Australia.
4
Department of Microbiology & Immunology, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT, USA.
5
Department of Microbiology & Immunology, Uniformed Services University, Bethesda, MD, USA.
6
One Health Research Group, College of Public Health, Medical and Veterinary Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD, Australia.
7
mEpiLab, Infectious Disease Research Centre, Hopkirk Research Institute, Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand.
8
Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom.
9
Department of Psychology, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
10
CSIRO Australian Animal Health Laboratory, Geelong, VIC, Australia.
11
Department of Epidemiological Sciences, Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA), Surrey, United Kingdom.
12
Faculty of Veterinary Science, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
13
Institute of Zoology, Zoological Society of London, NW1 4RY London, United Kingdom.
14
President Equine Veterinarians Australia, St Leonards, NSW, Australia.
15
Equine Research Unit, School of Agriculture and Food Sciences, University of Queensland, Gatton, QLD, Australia.
16
School of Veterinary and Life Sciences, Murdoch University, Murdoch, WA, Australia.
17
Programme in Emerging Infectious Diseases, Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore.

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