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Food Nutr Bull. 2016 Sep;37(3):375-386. doi: 10.1177/0379572116646280. Epub 2016 Jul 7.

Safety and Mortality Benefits of Delivering Vitamin A Supplementation at 6 Months of Age in Sub-Saharan Africa.

Author information

1
1 UNICEF Headquarters, New York, NY, USA.
2
2 Helen Keller International Headquarters, New York, NY, USA.
3
3 Helen Keller International Tanzania Country Office, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.
4
4 Helen Keller International Africa Regional Office, Nairobi, Kenya.
5
5 Program in International and Community Nutrition, Department of Nutrition, University of California, Davis, CA, USA.
6
6 Helen Keller International Africa Regional Office, Dakar, Senegal.
7
7 Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Seattle, WA, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Vitamin A supplementation (VAS) among children 6 to 59 months of age reduces vitamin A deficiency (VAD)-related mortality. Child health days (CHDs) only reach an estimated 16.7% of children at exactly 6 months, leaving uncovered children at risk of VAD-related mortality; similarly, VAS provided at 9 months of age with measles-containing vaccine leaves infants unprotected for 3 months.

OBJECTIVE:

Using data from sub-Saharan Africa, we estimated the mortality benefits and safety of providing VAS at age 6 months, compared to delivery through CHDs and at 9 months.

METHODS:

We modeled VAS-preventable mortality benefits at 6 months as a function of published VAS effect sizes, intervention coverage, and proportion of infant deaths occurring between 6 and 11 months. To evaluate safety, we modeled the effect of different VAS coverage scenarios on maximum hepatic vitamin A concentrations (HVACs).

RESULTS:

VAS linked to a 6-month visit could reduce infant mortality by an additional 1.95 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.38-2.52) and 1.63 (95% CI: 1.15-2.11) percentage points compared to VAS through CHDs and at 9 months, respectively. The HVAC models indicate that VAS at 6 months is safe even in the presence of a second VAS dose 1 month later and other food-based vitamin A control strategies.

CONCLUSION:

Advancing the first VAS dose to 6 months should be considered in settings where VAS is currently given first at 9 months. A 6-month VAS dose should also be considered in settings where VAS is delivered through CHDs. VAS delivery at 6 months could also serve as a platform to deliver other high-impact interventions.

KEYWORDS:

Africa South of the Sahara; deficiency; immunization; supplementation; vitamin A

PMID:
27150298
DOI:
10.1177/0379572116646280

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