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Nat Med. 2016 May 5;22(5):464-71. doi: 10.1038/nm.4089.

Facilitating a culture of responsible and effective sharing of cancer genome data.

Author information

1
Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.
2
Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen's University, Belfast, UK.
3
UC Santa Cruz Genomics Institute, University of California, Santa Cruz, California, USA.
4
Centre of Genomics and Policy, McGill University, Montreal, Canada.
5
The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
6
The Global Alliance for Genomics and Health, Toronto, Canada.
7
Gustave Roussy and Université Paris Sud, Villejuif, France.
8
Patient's Advocacy Committee, European Cancer Organization, Brussels, Belgium.
9
Translational Sciences, Oncology iMED, AstraZeneca, Waltham, Massachusetts, USA.
10
Department of Oncology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK.
11
Hospital Sírio-Libanês, São Paulo, Brazil.
12
Yonsei Cancer Research Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
13
Kaiser Permanente, Pasadena, California, USA.
14
Roche Innovation Center Basel, Pharma Research and Early Development, Roche, Basel, Switzerland.
15
Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA.
16
Advocacy for Canadian Children Oncology Network, Vancouver, Canada.
17
National Cancer Centre Singapore, Singapore.
18
University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Australia.
19
The Cancer Genome Atlas, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA.
20
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA.

Abstract

Rapid and affordable tumor molecular profiling has led to an explosion of clinical and genomic data poised to enhance the diagnosis, prognostication and treatment of cancer. A critical point has now been reached at which the analysis and storage of annotated clinical and genomic information in unconnected silos will stall the advancement of precision cancer care. Information systems must be harmonized to overcome the multiple technical and logistical barriers to data sharing. Against this backdrop, the Global Alliance for Genomic Health (GA4GH) was established in 2013 to create a common framework that enables responsible, voluntary and secure sharing of clinical and genomic data. This Perspective from the GA4GH Clinical Working Group Cancer Task Team highlights the data-aggregation challenges faced by the field, suggests potential collaborative solutions and describes how GA4GH can catalyze a harmonized data-sharing culture.

PMID:
27149219
PMCID:
PMC4995884
DOI:
10.1038/nm.4089
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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