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Front Physiol. 2016 Apr 19;7:138. doi: 10.3389/fphys.2016.00138. eCollection 2016.

Same Performance Changes after Live High-Train Low in Normobaric vs. Hypobaric Hypoxia.

Author information

1
Faculty of Biology and Medicine, Institute of Sport Sciences, University of LausanneLausanne, Switzerland; Department of Physiology, Faculty of Biology and Medicine, University of LausanneLausanne, Switzerland.
2
Faculty of Biology and Medicine, Institute of Sport Sciences, University of LausanneLausanne, Switzerland; National School of Mountain Sports/National Ski-Nordic CentrePrémanon, France.
3
Faculty of Biology and Medicine, Institute of Sport Sciences, University of LausanneLausanne, Switzerland; Section for Elite Sport, Swiss Federal Institute of SportMagglingen, Switzerland.
4
Faculty of Biology and Medicine, Institute of Sport Sciences, University of Lausanne Lausanne, Switzerland.
5
Departmental Section of Physical Education and Sports, University of Alicante Alicante, Spain.
6
Section for Elite Sport, Swiss Federal Institute of Sport Magglingen, Switzerland.
7
Swiss Laboratory for Doping Analyses, University of Lausanne Lausanne, Switzerland.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

We investigated the changes in physiological and performance parameters after a Live High-Train Low (LHTL) altitude camp in normobaric (NH) or hypobaric hypoxia (HH) to reproduce the actual training practices of endurance athletes using a crossover-designed study.

METHODS:

Well-trained triathletes (n = 16) were split into two groups and completed two 18-day LTHL camps during which they trained at 1100-1200 m and lived at 2250 m (P i O2 = 111.9 ± 0.6 vs. 111.6 ± 0.6 mmHg) under NH (hypoxic chamber; FiO2 18.05 ± 0.03%) or HH (real altitude; barometric pressure 580.2 ± 2.9 mmHg) conditions. The subjects completed the NH and HH camps with a 1-year washout period. Measurements and protocol were identical for both phases of the crossover study. Oxygen saturation (S p O2) was constantly recorded nightly. P i O2 and training loads were matched daily. Blood samples and VO2max were measured before (Pre-) and 1 day after (Post-1) LHTL. A 3-km running-test was performed near sea level before and 1, 7, and 21 days after training camps.

RESULTS:

Total hypoxic exposure was lower for NH than for HH during LHTL (230 vs. 310 h; P < 0.001). Nocturnal S p O2 was higher in NH than in HH (92.4 ± 1.2 vs. 91.3 ± 1.0%, P < 0.001). VO2max increased to the same extent for NH and HH (4.9 ± 5.6 vs. 3.2 ± 5.1%). No difference was found in hematological parameters. The 3-km run time was significantly faster in both conditions 21 days after LHTL (4.5 ± 5.0 vs. 6.2 ± 6.4% for NH and HH), and no difference between conditions was found at any time.

CONCLUSION:

Increases in VO2max and performance enhancement were similar between NH and HH conditions.

KEYWORDS:

aerobic exercise; altitude-training camp; crossover study; real altitude; simulated altitude

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