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J Clin Microbiol. 2016 Oct;54(10):2448-54. doi: 10.1128/JCM.00487-16. Epub 2016 May 4.

Laboratory Diagnosis of Congenital Toxoplasmosis.

Author information

1
Palo Alto Medical Foundation Toxoplasma Serology Laboratory, National Reference Center for the Study and Diagnosis of Toxoplasmosis, Palo Alto, California, USA Stanford University, Division of Infectious Diseases, Stanford, California, USA INSERM U1065, Centre Méditerranéen de Médecine Moléculaire, Toxines Microbiennes dans la Relation Hôte-Pathogènes, Nice, France Service de Parasitologie-Mycologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Nice, Nice, France.
2
Palo Alto Medical Foundation Toxoplasma Serology Laboratory, National Reference Center for the Study and Diagnosis of Toxoplasmosis, Palo Alto, California, USA Stanford University, Division of Infectious Diseases, Stanford, California, USA gilberto@stanford.edu.

Abstract

Recent studies have demonstrated that screening and treatment for toxoplasmosis during gestation result in a decrease of vertical transmission and clinical sequelae. Early treatment was associated with improved outcomes. Thus, laboratory methods should aim for early identification of infants with congenital toxoplasmosis (CT). Diagnostic approaches should include, at least, detection of Toxoplasma IgG, IgM, and IgA and a comprehensive review of maternal history, including the gestational age at which the mother was infected and treatment. Here, we review laboratory methods for the diagnosis of CT, with emphasis on serological tools. A diagnostic algorithm that takes into account maternal history is presented.

PMID:
27147724
PMCID:
PMC5035424
DOI:
10.1128/JCM.00487-16
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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