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Gastroenterology. 2016 May;150(6):1380-92. doi: 10.1053/j.gastro.2016.02.011.

Gastroduodenal Disorders.

Author information

1
Department of the Digestive System, University Hospital S. Orsola-Malpighi, Bologna, Italy; Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy. Electronic address: v.stanghellini@unibo.it.
2
Institute of Digestive Disease, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China.
3
Division of Gastroenterology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan.
4
Digestive System Research Unit, University Hospital Vall d'Hebron, Department of Medicine, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
5
Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Keio University, School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.
6
Translational Research Center for Gastrointestinal Disorders (TARGID), Department of Gastroenterology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
7
University of Newcastle, New Lambton, Australia.

Abstract

Symptoms that can be attributed to the gastroduodenal region represent one of the main subgroups among functional gastrointestinal disorders. A slightly modified classification into the following 4 categories is proposed: (1) functional dyspepsia, characterized by 1 or more of the following: postprandial fullness, early satiation, epigastric pain, and epigastric burning, which are unexplained after a routine clinical evaluation; and includes 2 subcategories: postprandial distress syndrome that is characterized by meal-induced dyspeptic symptoms and epigastric pain syndrome that does not occur exclusively postprandially; the 2 subgroups can overlap; (2) belching disorders, defined as audible escapes of air from the esophagus or the stomach, are classified into 2 subcategories, depending on the origin of the refluxed gas as detected by intraluminal impedance measurement belching: gastric and supragastric belch; (3) nausea and vomiting disorders, which include 3 subcategories: chronic nausea and vomiting syndrome; cyclic vomiting syndrome; and cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome; and (4) rumination syndrome.

KEYWORDS:

Belching; Dyspepsia; Nausea; Rumination; Vomiting

PMID:
27147122
DOI:
10.1053/j.gastro.2016.02.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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