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AIDS Behav. 2016 Nov;20(11):2717-2728.

Can Short-Term Use of Electronic Patient Adherence Monitoring Devices Improve Adherence in Patients Failing Second-Line Antiretroviral Therapy? Evidence from a Pilot Study in Johannesburg, South Africa.

Author information

1
Health Economics and Epidemiology Research Office, Department of Internal Medicine, School of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa. devans@heroza.org.
2
Right To Care, Johannesburg, South Africa.
3
Health Economics and Epidemiology Research Office, Department of Internal Medicine, School of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.
4
Department of Global Health, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.
5
Department of Epidemiology, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.

Abstract

High levels of adherence are required to achieve the full benefit of ART. We assess the effectiveness of electronic adherence monitoring devices among patients failing second-line ART, as measured by viral load suppression. Cohort study of Wisepill™ real-time adherence monitoring in addition to intensified adherence counselling over 3 months in adults with a viral load ≥400 copies/ml on second-line ART in Johannesburg, South Africa between August 2013 and January 2014. Patients were sent SMS reminders upon missing a scheduled dose. We compared outcomes to earlier historical cohorts receiving either intensified adherence counselling or adherence counselling alone. Overall, 63 % of the participants (31/49) took >80 % of their prescribed medication; this dropped from 76 to 53 and 49 % at 1, 2 and 3 months post-enrolment respectively. Compared to those with good adherence (>80 %), participants with poor adherence (≤80 %) had a higher risk for a subsequently elevated viral load ≥400 copies/ml (relative risk (RR) 1.47 95 % CI 0.97-2.23). Participants found the intervention "acceptable and useful" but by 6 months after eligibility they were only slightly more likely to be alive, in care and virally suppressed compared to those who received intensified adherence counselling (44.9 vs. 38.5 %; RR 1.19; 95 % CI 0.85-1.67) or adherence counselling alone (44.9 vs. 40.9 %; RR 1.12; 95 % CI 0.81-1.56). In patients with an elevated viral load on second-line ART electronic adherence monitoring was associated with a modest, but not significant, improvement in viral suppression.

KEYWORDS:

Adherence; Electronic adherence monitoring device (EAMD); Second-line; Viral suppression; Wisepill™

PMID:
27146828
PMCID:
PMC5069329
DOI:
10.1007/s10461-016-1417-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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