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Transl Behav Med. 2016 Sep;6(3):478-81. doi: 10.1007/s13142-016-0407-7.

Increasing US health plan coverage for exercise programming in community mental health settings for people with serious mental illness: a position statement from the Society of Behavior Medicine and the American College of Sports Medicine.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, 105 Pleasant Street, Main Building, Dartmouth College, Concord, NH, 03301, USA. Sarah.I.Pratt@Dartmouth.edu.
2
Department of Kinesiology, Towson University, Towson, MD, USA.
3
Division of General Internal Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA.
4
Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine & Science, Chicago, IL, USA.
5
American College of Sports Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, USA.
6
School of Nutrition and Health Promotion, Arizona State University, Phoenix, AZ, USA.
7
Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Miami, Miami, FL, USA.
8
Department of Psychiatry, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, 105 Pleasant Street, Main Building, Dartmouth College, Concord, NH, 03301, USA.
9
VA Center for Clinical Management Research, VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System, Ann Arbor, MI, 48105, USA.

Abstract

Adults with serious mental illness die more than 10 years earlier than the average American. Premature mortality is due to the high prevalence of preventable diseases including cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Poor lifestyle behaviors including lack of exercise and physical inactivity contribute to the epidemic levels of obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease observed among adults with serious mental illness. Not surprisingly, people with serious mental illness are among the most costly consumers of health services due to increased visits for poorly managed mental and physical health. Recent studies have demonstrated that exercise interventions based on community mental health settings can significantly improve physical and mental health in people with serious mental illness. However, current funding regulations limit the ability of community mental health settings to offer exercise programming services to people with serious mental illness. Policy efforts are needed to improve the dissemination and sustainability of exercise programs for people with serious mental illness.

KEYWORDS:

Bipolar disorder; Exercise; Health policy; Physical activity; Schizophrenia; Serious mental illness

PMID:
27146275
PMCID:
PMC4987610
DOI:
10.1007/s13142-016-0407-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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