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Oncotarget. 2016 Jun 7;7(23):34907-17. doi: 10.18632/oncotarget.8995.

Systemic release of osteoprotegerin during oxaliplatin-containing induction chemotherapy and favorable systemic outcome of sequential radiotherapy in rectal cancer.

Author information

1
Department of Oncology, Akershus University Hospital, Lørenskog, Norway.
2
Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
3
Institute of Clinical Molecular Biology, Akershus University Hospital, Lørenskog, Norway.
4
Department of Oncology, Oslo University Hospital, Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
5
Department of Tumor Biology, Oslo University Hospital, Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
6
Department of Gastroenterological Surgery, Oslo University Hospital, Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo, Norway.

Abstract

In colorectal cancer, immune effectors may be determinative for disease outcome. Following curatively intended combined-modality therapy in locally advanced rectal cancer metastatic disease still remains a dominant cause of failure. Here, we investigated whether circulating immune factors might correlate with outcome. An antibody array was applied to assay changes of approximately 500 proteins in serial serum samples collected from patients during oxaliplatin-containing induction chemotherapy and sequential chemoradiotherapy before final pelvic surgery. Array data was analyzed by the Significance Analysis of Microarrays software and indicated significant alterations in serum osteoprotegerin (TNFRSF11B) during the treatment course, which were confirmed by osteoprotegerin measures using a single-parameter immunoassay. Patients experiencing increase in circulating osteoprotegerin during the chemotherapy had significantly better 5-year progression-free survival than those without increase (78% versus 48%; P = 0.009 by log-rank test). Hence, systemic release of this soluble tumor necrosis factor decoy receptor following the induction phase of neoadjuvant therapy was associated with favorable long-term outcome in patients given curatively intended chemoradiotherapy and surgery but with metastatic disease as the main adverse event. This finding suggests that osteoprotegerin may mediate or reflect systemic anti-tumor immunity invoked by combined-modality therapy in locally advanced rectal cancer.

KEYWORDS:

metastasis; osteoprotegerin; oxaliplatin; radiotherapy; rectal cancer

PMID:
27145458
PMCID:
PMC5085198
DOI:
10.18632/oncotarget.8995
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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