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J Phys Act Health. 2016 Aug;13(8):888-94. doi: 10.1123/jpah.2016-0028. Epub 2016 May 4.

The Effect of a Comprehensive School Physical Activity Program on Physical Activity and Health-Related Fitness in Children From Low-Income Families.

Author information

1
Dept of Exercise and Sport Science, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of a Comprehensive School Physical Activity Program (CSPAP) on physical activity and health-related fitness (HRF) in children from low-income families.

METHODS:

Participants included 1390 children recruited from kindergarten through sixth grade (mean age = 8.4 ± 1.8 years). Physical activity measures were collected at baseline and at 6 weeks and 12 weeks after program implementation, and HRF measures were collected at baseline and at 12 weeks after program implementation.

RESULTS:

There were significant but weak-to-moderate increases in step counts (mean difference = 603.1 steps, P < .001, d = 0.39) and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (mean difference = 4.9 minutes, P < .001, d = 0.39) at 12 weeks compared with baseline. There were also significant but moderate increases in Progressive Aerobic Cardiovascular Endurance Run laps (mean difference = 6.5 laps, P < .001, d = 0.47) at 12 weeks compared with baseline. Generalized mixed models respectively yielded 3.02 and 2.34 greater odds that a child would achieve step count and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity standards and 2.26 greater odds that a child would achieve aerobic fitness standards at 12 weeks compared with baseline (P < .001).

CONCLUSIONS:

The 12-week CSPAP improved physical activity and HRF in children from low-income families; however, the magnitude of the effects was weak to moderate.

PMID:
27144329
DOI:
10.1123/jpah.2016-0028
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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