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Br J Psychiatry. 2016 May;208(5):409-11. doi: 10.1192/bjp.bp.115.166314.

Is sleep disruption a trigger for postpartum psychosis?

Author information

1
Katie J. S. Lewis, BSc, Institute of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences, Cardiff University; Russell G. Foster, BSc, PhD, FRS, Sleep and Circadian Neuroscience Institute, Nuffield Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Oxford, Oxford; Ian R. Jones, MRCPsych, PhD, Institute of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK.
2
Katie J. S. Lewis, BSc, Institute of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences, Cardiff University; Russell G. Foster, BSc, PhD, FRS, Sleep and Circadian Neuroscience Institute, Nuffield Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Oxford, Oxford; Ian R. Jones, MRCPsych, PhD, Institute of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK JonesIR1@cardiff.ac.uk.

Abstract

An episode of postpartum psychosis can be devastating for a woman and her family, and it is vital we understand the factors involved in the aetiology of this condition. Sleep and circadian rhythm disruption is a plausible candidate but further research is needed that builds on the latest advances in chronobiology and neuroscience.

PMID:
27143002
DOI:
10.1192/bjp.bp.115.166314
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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