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Lung. 2016 Oct;194(5):705-14. doi: 10.1007/s00408-016-9885-0. Epub 2016 May 3.

Applications of Nasal High-Flow Oxygen Therapy in Critically ill Adult Patients.

Author information

1
VA Western New York Healthcare System, Division of Critical Care Medicine, Department of Anesthesiology, School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, USA. jahan.porhomayon@va.gov.
2
VA Medical Center, Rm 203C, 3495 Bailey Ave, Buffalo, NY, 14215, USA. jahan.porhomayon@va.gov.
3
VA Western New York Healthcare System, Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine, Department of Medicine, School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, USA.
4
Department of Anesthesiology, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, USA.
5
VA Western New York Healthcare System, Division of Cardiothoracic Anesthesia and Pain Medicine, Department of Anesthesiology, School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, USA.

Abstract

The use of nasal high-flow oxygen therapy (NHFOT) has become increasingly common in hospitals across Europe, Asia, and North America. These high utility devices provide an efficient and comfortable access points for providing supplemental oxygen to patients with variety of respiratory disorders. They are relatively easy to set up, and clinicians and patients alike give very positive feedback about their ease of use and comfort for patients in the hospital setting. However, it remains uncertain whether NHFOT improves patient survival or even reduces respiratory complications. Outcome data in adult populations are few and frequently underpowered to guide physicians for their widespread use in hospital setting. In this article, we present a review of the current technology and available studies pertinent to NHFOT.

KEYWORDS:

Intensive care unit; Nasal; Oxygen; Respiratory failure

PMID:
27142658
DOI:
10.1007/s00408-016-9885-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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