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Clin Neurol Neurosurg. 2016 Jul;146:40-4. doi: 10.1016/j.clineuro.2016.04.022. Epub 2016 Apr 27.

Risk factors for convertion to clinically defined multiple sclerosis after clinically isolated syndrome in a racially mixed Brazilian cohort.

Author information

1
Universidade Federal do Estado do Rio de Janeiro-UNIRIO/Hospital Universitário Gaffree Guinle, Brazil. Electronic address: anacriswing@globo.com.
2
Universidade Federal do Estado do Rio de Janeiro-UNIRIO/Hospital Universitário Gaffree Guinle, Brazil.
3
Universidade Federal do Estado do Rio de Janeiro-UNIRIO/Hospital Universitário Gaffree Guinle, Brazil; Hospital Federal da Lagoa, Brazil.
4
Instituto Nacional do Cancer-INCA, Brazil.

Abstract

Clinically isolated syndrome may reflect the first symptom of Multiple Sclerosis. Though more prevalent in Caucasians, MS can also affect Afrodescendts. Modifying disease drugs can delay convertion to clinically defined multiple sclerosis, therefore, identify patients at a higher risk of convertion is important. However data of risk factors in racially mixed population are scarce.

OBJECTIVES:

To analyze predictor factors to the conversion from CIS to CDMS in a mixed race Brazilian cohort.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

It is a prognostic observational retrospective study, in 122 patients from MS referential center at Hospital da Lagoa, Rio de Janeiro-Brazil. Demographic and clinical features, as well as MRI and cerebrospinal fluid data were analyzed.

RESULTS:

After five years follow-up 87.3% converted to CDMS. Regarding to median time of conversion, there was no difference between gender, race, age at onset, mono or polysymptomatic presentation. Cerebellar CIS significantly reduced time to second event; likewise sphincter impairment. Considering DMD, patients without treatment converted earlier.

CONCLUSION:

Ancestry did not influence conversion risk. Cerebellar and shpincter impairment as well as MRI criteria both Barkhof/Tintoré and Swanton were important predictors. In future studies it should be also analysed the risk factors of progression in mixed race populations.

KEYWORDS:

Afrodescendt; Clinicaly isolated syndrome; Convertion; Multiple sclerosis; Risk factors

PMID:
27138303
DOI:
10.1016/j.clineuro.2016.04.022
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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