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Cell Syst. 2016 Mar 23;2(3):185-95. doi: 10.1016/j.cels.2016.02.015. Epub 2016 Mar 23.

Plasma Proteome Profiling to Assess Human Health and Disease.

Author information

1
Department of Proteomics and Signal Transduction, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, 82152 Martinsried, Germany; NNF Center for Protein Research, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, 2200 Copenhagen, Denmark.
2
Department of Proteomics and Signal Transduction, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, 82152 Martinsried, Germany.
3
Institute of Laboratory Medicine, Ludwig-Maximilians University Munich, 80539 Munich, Germany.
4
Department of Proteomics and Signal Transduction, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, 82152 Martinsried, Germany; NNF Center for Protein Research, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, 2200 Copenhagen, Denmark. Electronic address: mmann@biochem.mpg.de.

Abstract

Proteins in the circulatory system mirror an individual's physiology. In daily clinical practice, protein levels are generally determined using single-protein immunoassays. High-throughput, quantitative analysis using mass-spectrometry-based proteomics of blood, plasma, and serum would be advantageous but is challenging because of the high dynamic range of protein abundances. Here, we introduce a rapid and robust "plasma proteome profiling" pipeline. This single-run shotgun proteomic workflow does not require protein depletion and enables quantitative analysis of hundreds of plasma proteomes from 1 μl single finger pricks with 20 min gradients. The apolipoprotein family, inflammatory markers such as C-reactive protein, gender-related proteins, and >40 FDA-approved biomarkers are reproducibly quantified (CV <20% with label-free quantification). Furthermore, we functionally interpret a 1,000-protein, quantitative plasma proteome obtained by simple peptide pre-fractionation. Plasma proteome profiling delivers an informative portrait of a person's health state, and we envision its large-scale use in biomedicine.

KEYWORDS:

apolipoproteins; blood analysis; clinic; disease; human; mass spectrometry; plasma proteome profile

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PMID:
27135364
DOI:
10.1016/j.cels.2016.02.015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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