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J Phys Ther Sci. 2016 Mar;28(3):738-42. doi: 10.1589/jpts.28.738. Epub 2016 Mar 31.

Evaluation of electromyographic signals in children with bruxism before and after therapy with Melissa Officinalis L-a randomized controlled clinical trial.

Author information

1
Postgraduate Program in Rehabilitation Sciences, Nove de Julho University (UNINOVE), Brazil.
2
Postgraduate Program in Biophotonics Applied to Health Sciences, Nove de Julho University (UNINOVE), Brazil.
3
Postgraduate Program in Health Sciences, Nove de Julho University (UNINOVE), Brazil.
4
School of Dentistry, Nove de Julho University (UNINOVE), Brazil.
5
Postgraduate Program in Rehabilitation Sciences and Postgraduate Program in Biophotonics Applied to Health Sciences, Nove de Julho University (UNINOVE), Brazil.

Abstract

[Purpose] Bruxism is a repetitive muscle activity involving the clenching or grinding of one's teeth during sleep or waking hours. Melissa officinalis L. may be employed as a natural therapy due to the sedative, anxiolytic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-spasm properties of the chemical constituents of the essential oil obtained from its leaves. The aim of the present study was to evaluate electromyographic signals in the temporal muscle using the BiteStrip(®) test on children with sleep bruxism before and after therapy with Melissa officinalis L. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were randomly allocated to two groups. Group 1 (n = 12) ingested a tincture containing Melissa officinalis L. for 30 days. Group 2 (n = 12) received a placebo solution with the same dose and frequency as Group 1. The Wilcoxon and Mann-Whitney tests were employed for statistical analysis. [Results] The sample was made up of 24 children aged 6 to 10 years. No statistically significant differences were found between initial and final muscle activity in either group or in an intergroup comparison. [Conclusion] Use of the Melissa officinalis L. tincture at the dose employed did not lead to a reduction in muscle activity in children with bruxism.

KEYWORDS:

Bruxism; Electromyographic; Melissa officinalis

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