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Biosens Bioelectron. 2016 Sep 15;83:213-20. doi: 10.1016/j.bios.2016.04.064. Epub 2016 Apr 21.

Lysosomal ATP imaging in living cells by a water-soluble cationic polythiophene derivative.

Author information

1
State key Laboratory of Coordination Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093, PR China.
2
State key Laboratory of Coordination Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093, PR China. Electronic address: gengzr@nju.edu.cn.
3
State key Laboratory of Coordination Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093, PR China. Electronic address: wangzl@nju.edu.cn.

Abstract

Lysosomes in astrocytes and microglia can release ATP as the signaling molecule for the cells through ca(2+)-dependent exocytosis in response to various stimuli. At present, fluorescent probes that can detect ATP in lysosomes have not been reported. In this work, we have developed a new water-soluble cationic polythiophene derivative that can be specifically localized in lysosomes and can be utilized as a fluorescent probe to sense ATP in cells. PEMTEI exhibits high selectivity and sensitivity to ATP at physiological pH values and the detection limit of ATP is as low as 10(-11)M. The probe has low cytotoxicity, good permeability and high photostability in living cells and has been applied successfully to real-time monitoring of the change in concentrations of ATP in lysosomes though fluorescence microscopy. We also demonstrated that lysosomes in Hela cells can release ATP through Ca(2+)-dependent exocytosis in response to drug stimuli.

KEYWORDS:

ATP; Detection; Fluorescence imaging; Lysosome; Water-soluble cationic polythiophene derivative

PMID:
27131993
DOI:
10.1016/j.bios.2016.04.064
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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