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Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2016 Jun;40(6):1166-81. doi: 10.1111/acer.13071. Epub 2016 Apr 30.

Alcohol Use and Breast Cancer: A Critical Review.

Author information

1
Section of Cancer Surveillance, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France.
2
Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH), Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
3
Campbell Family Mental Health Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
4
Institute of Medical Science (IMS), University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
5
Institute of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, Germany.
6
Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
7
Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Abstract

The objective of this study was to outline the biological pathways of alcohol-attributable breast cancer, the epidemiological risk relationship between alcohol consumption and breast cancer, and the global burden of breast cancer incidence and mortality attributable to alcohol consumption, with a focus on light drinking. First, the literature regarding the biological mechanisms of how alcohol affects the risk of breast cancer was reviewed and summarized. Second, a search of meta-analyses that evaluated the risk relationship between alcohol consumption and breast cancer was conducted. Last, the burden of alcohol-attributable breast cancer incidence and mortality was estimated by means of a Population-Attributable Fraction methodology. Data on alcohol consumption were obtained from the Global Information System on Alcohol and Health, and data on cancer incidence and mortality were obtained from the GLOBOCAN database. Alcohol consumption affects breast cancer risk through the alteration in hormone levels and the associated biological pathways, the metabolism of ethanol resulting in carcinogens, and the inhibition of the one carbon metabolism pathway. The systematic review found 15 meta-analyses on the risk relationship between alcohol consumption (also light consumption) and the risk of breast cancer. All but 2 of these analyses showed a dose-response relationship between alcohol consumption and the risk of breast cancer. An estimated 144,000 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 88,000 to 200,000) breast cancer cases and 38,000 (95% CI: 2,400 to 53,000) breast cancer deaths globally in 2012 were attributable to alcohol, with 18.8% of these cases and 17.5% of these deaths affecting women who were light alcohol consumers. All levels of evidence showed a risk relationship between alcohol consumption and the risk of breast cancer, even at low levels of consumption. Due to this strong relationship, and to the amount of alcohol consumed globally, the incidence of and mortality from alcohol-attributable breast cancer is large.

KEYWORDS:

Alcohol; Breast Cancer; Incidence; Mortality; Systematic Review

PMID:
27130687
DOI:
10.1111/acer.13071
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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