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Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2016 Aug;89(6):961-6. doi: 10.1007/s00420-016-1130-x. Epub 2016 Apr 29.

Impact of night-shift work on the prevalence of erosive esophagitis in shipyard male workers.

Author information

1
Department of Family Medicine, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Ulsan University Hospital, 877 Bangeojinsunwhando-Ro, Dong-Gu, Ulsan, 44033, Korea.
2
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Ulsan University Hospital, 877 Bangeojinsunwhando-Ro, Dong-Gu, Ulsan, 44033, Korea. oemdoc@naver.com.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Whether night-shift work is a risk factor for gastroesophageal reflux disease is controversial. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between night-shift work and other factors, and erosive esophagitis.

METHODS:

A cross-sectional study with 6040 male shipyard workers was performed. Esophagogastroduodenoscopic examination and a survey about night-shift work status, lifestyle, medical history, educational status, and marital status were conducted in all workers. The odds ratios of erosive esophagitis according to night-shift work status were calculated by using the logistic regression model.

RESULTS:

The prevalence of erosive esophagitis increased in the night-shift workers [odds ratio, 95 % confidence interval: 1.41 (1.03-1.94)]. According to multiple logistic regression models, night-shift work, obesity, smoking, and alcohol consumption of ≥140 g/week were significant risk factors for erosive esophagitis. By contrast, Helicobacter pylori infection was negatively associated with erosive esophagitis.

CONCLUSION:

Night-shift work is suggested to be a risk factor for erosive esophagitis. Avoidance of night-shift work and lifestyle modification should be considered for prevention and management of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

KEYWORDS:

Erosive esophagitis; Male workers; Night-shift work; Prevalence

PMID:
27129469
PMCID:
PMC4927591
DOI:
10.1007/s00420-016-1130-x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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