Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Mediators Inflamm. 2016;2016:4173962. doi: 10.1155/2016/4173962. Epub 2016 Apr 3.

Effects of Low-Dose and Long-Term Treatment with Erythromycin on Interleukin-17 and Interleukin-23 in Peripheral Blood and Induced Sputum in Patients with Stable Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

Author information

1
Department of Respiratory Medicine, First Affiliated Hospital of Guangxi Medical University, Nanning, Guangxi 530021, China.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To study the effects of low-dose and long-term treatment with erythromycin on IL-17 and IL-23, in peripheral blood and induced sputum, in patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

METHODS:

Patients were randomly divided into placebo-treated group, group A (12 months of additive treatment with erythromycin, N = 18), and group B (6 months of additive treatment with erythromycin followed by 6 months of follow-up, N = 18). Inflammatory cells in induced sputum, pulmonary function, and the 6-minute walk distance (6MWD) were analyzed. Concentrations of IL-17 and IL-23 in peripheral blood and sputum were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays.

RESULTS:

After treatment, sputum and peripheral blood concentrations of IL-17 and IL-23 significantly decreased in groups A and B compared with placebo-treated group. There were no significant differences after erythromycin withdrawal at months 9 and 12 in group B compared with placebo-treated group. An increase in 6MWD was observed after treatment.

CONCLUSIONS:

Erythromycin was beneficial and reduced airway inflammation in COPD patients. Underlying mechanisms may involve inhibition of IL-17 and IL-23 mediated airway inflammation. COPD patients treated with erythromycin for 6 months experienced improved exercise capacity. Finally, treatment for 12 months may be more effective than treatment for 6 months.

PMID:
27127346
PMCID:
PMC4834156
DOI:
10.1155/2016/4173962
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Hindawi Limited Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center