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Science. 2016 Apr 29;352(6285):590-5. doi: 10.1126/science.aaf3621.

Slow waves, sharp waves, ripples, and REM in sleeping dragons.

Author information

1
Max Planck Institute for Brain Research, Frankfurt am Main, Germany.

Abstract

Sleep has been described in animals ranging from worms to humans. Yet the electrophysiological characteristics of brain sleep, such as slow-wave (SW) and rapid eye movement (REM) activities, are thought to be restricted to mammals and birds. Recording from the brain of a lizard, the Australian dragon Pogona vitticeps, we identified SW and REM sleep patterns, thus pushing back the probable evolution of these dynamics at least to the emergence of amniotes. The SW and REM sleep patterns that we observed in lizards oscillated continuously for 6 to 10 hours with a period of ~80 seconds. The networks controlling SW-REM antagonism in amniotes may thus originate from a common, ancient oscillator circuit. Lizard SW dynamics closely resemble those observed in rodent hippocampal CA1, yet they originate from a brain area, the dorsal ventricular ridge, that has no obvious hodological similarity with the mammalian hippocampus.

PMID:
27126045
DOI:
10.1126/science.aaf3621
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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