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Science. 2016 Apr 29;352(6285):565-9. doi: 10.1126/science.aad3369. Epub 2016 Apr 28.

Population-based metagenomics analysis reveals markers for gut microbiome composition and diversity.

Author information

1
University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Genetics, Groningen, Netherlands. Top Institute Food and Nutrition, Wageningen, Netherlands. a.zhernakova@umcg.nl c.wijmenga@umcg.nl j.fu@umcg.nl.
2
Institute of Chemical Biology and Fundamental Medicine SB RAS, Novosibirsk, Russia. Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk, Russia.
3
University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Genetics, Groningen, Netherlands.
4
University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Genetics, Groningen, Netherlands. Top Institute Food and Nutrition, Wageningen, Netherlands.
5
The Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, MA, USA. Department of Biostatistics, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.
6
The Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, MA, USA. Department of Computer Science, Aalto University School of Science, Espoo, Finland.
7
Top Institute Food and Nutrition, Wageningen, Netherlands. Division of Gastroenterology-Hepatology, Department of Internal Medicine, NUTRIM School of Nutrition and Translational Research in Metabolism, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, Netherlands.
8
University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Groningen, Netherlands.
9
KU Leuven-University of Leuven, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Rega Institute for Medical Research, Laboratory of Molecular Bacteriology, Leuven, Belgium. VIB, Center for the Biology of Disease, Leuven, Belgium.
10
University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Pediatrics, Groningen, Netherlands.
11
KU Leuven-University of Leuven, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Rega Institute for Medical Research, Laboratory of Molecular Bacteriology, Leuven, Belgium. VIB, Center for the Biology of Disease, Leuven, Belgium. Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Faculty of Sciences and Bioengineering Sciences, Microbiology Unit, Brussels, Belgium.
12
University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Genetics, Groningen, Netherlands. Microbial Ecology, Nutrition and Health Research Group, Institute of Agrochemistry and Food Technology, National Research Council (IATA-CSIC), Valencia, Spain. Department of Pediatrics, Dr. Peset University Hospital, Valencia, Spain.
13
University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Genetics, Groningen, Netherlands. University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Genomics Coordination Center, Groningen, Netherlands.
14
Top Institute Food and Nutrition, Wageningen, Netherlands. Division of Human Nutrition, Wageningen University, Wageningen, Netherlands.
15
Department of Internal Medicine and Radboud Center for Infectious Diseases, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, Netherlands.
16
The Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, MA, USA.
17
Division of Gastroenterology-Hepatology, Department of Internal Medicine, NUTRIM School of Nutrition and Translational Research in Metabolism, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, Netherlands.
18
Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk, Russia. Centre for Global Health Research, Usher Institute of Population Health Sciences and Informatics, University of Edinburgh, Teviot Place, Edinburgh EH8 9AG, UK. PolyOmica, Groningen, Netherlands. Institute of Cytology and Genetics SB RAS, Novosibirsk, Russia.
19
The Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, MA, USA. Center for Computational and Integrative Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. Gastrointestinal Unit and Center for the Study of Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. Center for Microbiome Informatics and Therapeutics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA.
20
University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Genetics, Groningen, Netherlands. a.zhernakova@umcg.nl c.wijmenga@umcg.nl j.fu@umcg.nl.
21
University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Genetics, Groningen, Netherlands. University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Pediatrics, Groningen, Netherlands. a.zhernakova@umcg.nl c.wijmenga@umcg.nl j.fu@umcg.nl.

Abstract

Deep sequencing of the gut microbiomes of 1135 participants from a Dutch population-based cohort shows relations between the microbiome and 126 exogenous and intrinsic host factors, including 31 intrinsic factors, 12 diseases, 19 drug groups, 4 smoking categories, and 60 dietary factors. These factors collectively explain 18.7% of the variation seen in the interindividual distance of microbial composition. We could associate 110 factors to 125 species and observed that fecal chromogranin A (CgA), a protein secreted by enteroendocrine cells, was exclusively associated with 61 microbial species whose abundance collectively accounted for 53% of microbial composition. Low CgA concentrations were seen in individuals with a more diverse microbiome. These results are an important step toward a better understanding of environment-diet-microbe-host interactions.

PMID:
27126040
PMCID:
PMC5240844
DOI:
10.1126/science.aad3369
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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