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Ageing Res Rev. 2016 Dec;32:2-12. doi: 10.1016/j.arr.2016.04.009. Epub 2016 Apr 26.

The crucial impact of lysosomes in aging and longevity.

Author information

1
Institute of Molecular Biosciences, NAWI Graz, University of Graz, 8010 Graz, Austria.
2
University of Utah, Department of Biochemistry, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-5650, USA.
3
Institute of Molecular Biosciences, NAWI Graz, University of Graz, 8010 Graz, Austria; BioTechMed, Graz, Austria.
4
Institute of Molecular Biosciences, NAWI Graz, University of Graz, 8010 Graz, Austria. Electronic address: ru.ruckenstuhl@uni-graz.at.

Abstract

Lysosomes are the main catabolic organelles of a cell and play a pivotal role in a plethora of cellular processes, including responses to nutrient availability and composition, stress resistance, programmed cell death, plasma membrane repair, development, and cell differentiation. In line with this pleiotropic importance for cellular and organismal life and death, lysosomal dysfunction is associated with many age-related pathologies like Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease, as well as with a decline in lifespan. Conversely, targeting lysosomal functional capacity is emerging as a means to promote longevity. Here, we analyze the current knowledge on the prominent influence of lysosomes on aging-related processes, such as their executory and regulatory roles during general and selective macroautophagy, or their storage capacity for amino acids and ions. In addition, we review and discuss the roles of lysosomes as active players in the mechanisms underlying known lifespan-extending interventions like, for example, spermidine or rapamycin administration. In conclusion, this review aims at critically examining the nature and pliability of the different layers, in which lysosomes are involved as a control hub for aging and longevity.

KEYWORDS:

Aging; Autophagy; Lifespan; Longevity; Lysosome; Vacuole

PMID:
27125853
PMCID:
PMC5081277
DOI:
10.1016/j.arr.2016.04.009
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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