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Ann Emerg Med. 2016 Nov;68(5):553-561. doi: 10.1016/j.annemergmed.2016.02.005. Epub 2016 Apr 26.

Pilot Study of Kano "Attractive Quality" Techniques to Identify Change in Emergency Department Patient Experience.

Author information

1
Department of Emergency Medicine, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN. Electronic address: bellamkonda.venkatesh@mayo.edu.
2
Department of Internal Medicine, Hennepin County Medical Center, Minneapolis, MN.
3
Department of Emergency Medicine, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN.
4
Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN.

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVE:

We describe the use of the Kano Attractive Quality analytic tool to improve an identified patient experience gap in perceived compassion by emergency department (ED) providers.

METHODS:

In phase 1, point-of-service surveying assessed baseline patient perception of ED provider compassion. Phase 2 deployed Kano surveys to predict the effect of 4 proposed interventions on patient perception. Finally, phase 3 compared patients receiving standard care versus the Kano-identified intervention to assess the actual effect on patient experience.

RESULTS:

In phase 1, 193 of 200 surveys (97%) were completed, showing a baseline median score of 4 out of 5 (interquartile range [IQR] 3 to 5), with top box percentage of 33% for patients' perception of receiving compassionate care. In phase 2, 158 of 180 surveys (88%) using Kano-formatted questions were completed, and the data predicted that increasing shared decisionmaking would cause the greatest improvement in the patient experience. Finally, in phase 3, 45 of 49 surveys (92%) were returned and demonstrated a significant improvement in perceived concern and sensitivity, 5 (IQR 5 to 5) versus 4 (IQR 3 to 5) with a difference of 1 (95% CI 0.1-1.9) and a top box rating of 79% versus 35% with a difference of 44% (95% CI 12-66) by patients who received dedicated shared decisionmaking interventions versus those receiving standard of care.

CONCLUSION:

Kano analysis is likely predictive of change in patient experience. Kano methods may prove as useful in changing management of the health care industry as it has been in other industries.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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