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J Hosp Infect. 2016 Aug;93(4):355-9. doi: 10.1016/j.jhin.2016.02.021. Epub 2016 Mar 11.

Post-caesarean section surgical site infections at a Tanzanian tertiary hospital: a prospective observational study.

Author information

1
Resource Centre for Infectious Diseases, Dodoma Regional Referral Hospital, Dodoma, Tanzania; 'Lazzaro Spallanzani' National Institute for Infectious Diseases-IRCCS, Rome, Italy. Electronic address: pasquale.denardo@inmi.it.
2
Resource Centre for Infectious Diseases, Dodoma Regional Referral Hospital, Dodoma, Tanzania; Department of Infectious Diseases, Tor Vergata University Hospital, Rome, Italy.
3
Resource Centre for Infectious Diseases, Dodoma Regional Referral Hospital, Dodoma, Tanzania; 'Lazzaro Spallanzani' National Institute for Infectious Diseases-IRCCS, Rome, Italy.
4
'Lazzaro Spallanzani' National Institute for Infectious Diseases-IRCCS, Rome, Italy.
5
Resource Centre for Infectious Diseases, Dodoma Regional Referral Hospital, Dodoma, Tanzania.
6
University of Dodoma - UDOM, Department of Statistics, Dodoma, Tanzania.
7
Resource Centre for Infectious Diseases, Dodoma Regional Referral Hospital, Dodoma, Tanzania; Department of Health Sciences, Clinic of Infectious Diseases, 'San Paolo' Hospital, University of Milan, Milan, Italy.
8
Division of Infection and Immunity, University College London, London, UK; NIHR Biomedical Research Centre at UCL Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK.

Abstract

Few data are available on the determinants and characteristics of post-caesarean section (CS) surgical site infections (SSIs) in resource-limited settings. We conducted a prospective observational cohort study to evaluate the rates, determinants, and microbiological characteristics of post-CS SSI at the Dodoma Regional Referral Hospital (DRRH) Gynaecology and Obstetrics Department in Tanzania. Spanning a three-month period, all pregnant women who underwent CS were enrolled and followed up for 30 days. SSI following CS occurred in 224 (48%) women. Only 10 (2.1%) women received pre-incision antibiotic prophylaxis. Urgent intervention is needed to prevent and control infections and contain the rising rate of post-CS SSI at the DRRH.

KEYWORDS:

Antibiotic prophylaxis; Antimicrobial resistance; Caesarean section; Pregnant women; Resource-limited settings; Surgical site infection

PMID:
27125664
DOI:
10.1016/j.jhin.2016.02.021
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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