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Eur Radiol. 2017 Jan;27(1):404-413. Epub 2016 Apr 27.

Partial meniscectomy is associated with increased risk of incident radiographic osteoarthritis and worsening cartilage damage in the following year.

Author information

1
Quantitative Imaging Center, Department of Radiology, Boston University School of Medicine, FGH Building, 3rd floor, 820 Harrison Avenue, Boston, MA, 02118, USA. frank.roemer@uk-erlangen.de.
2
Department of Radiology, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Maximiliansplatz 1, 91054, Erlangen, Germany. frank.roemer@uk-erlangen.de.
3
University of Arizona Arthritis Center & University of Arizona College of Medicine, 1501 N Campbell Ave, Tucson, AZ, 85724, USA.
4
Division of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, S700 Biomedical Science Tower, 3500 Terrace Street, Pittsburgh, PA, 15261, USA.
5
Department of Rheumatology, Royal North Shore Hospital and Kolling Institute, University of Sydney, Pacific Hwy, St Leonards, NSW 2065, Australia.
6
Institute of Anatomy, Paracelsus Medical University, Strubergasse 21, 5020, Salzburg, Austria.
7
Department of Epidemiology, University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health, 130 De Soto Street, Pittsburgh, PA, 15261, USA.
8
Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Orthopaedics, Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Lund University, Klinikgatan 22, SE-221 85, Lund, Sweden.
9
Quantitative Imaging Center, Department of Radiology, Boston University School of Medicine, FGH Building, 3rd floor, 820 Harrison Avenue, Boston, MA, 02118, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To assess whether partial meniscectomy is associated with increased risk of radiographic osteoarthritis (ROA) and worsening cartilage damage in the following year.

METHODS:

We studied 355 knees from the Osteoarthritis Initiative that developed ROA (Kellgren-Lawrence grade ≥ 2), which were matched with control knees. The MR images were assessed using the semi-quantitative MOAKS system. Conditional logistic regression was applied to estimate risk of incident ROA. Logistic regression was used to assess the risk of worsening cartilage damage in knees with partial meniscectomy that developed ROA.

RESULTS:

In the group with incident ROA, 4.4 % underwent partial meniscectomy during the year prior to the case-defining visit, compared with none of the knees that did not develop ROA. All (n = 31) knees that had partial meniscectomy and 58.9 % (n = 165) of the knees with prevalent meniscal damage developed ROA (OR = 2.51, 95 % CI [1.73, 3.64]). In knees that developed ROA, partial meniscectomy was associated with an increased risk of worsening cartilage damage (OR = 4.51, 95 % CI [1.53, 13.33]).

CONCLUSIONS:

The probability of having had partial meniscectomy was higher in knees that developed ROA. When looking only at knees that developed ROA, partial meniscectomy was associated with greater risk of worsening cartilage damage.

KEY POINTS:

• Partial meniscectomy is a controversial treatment option for degenerative meniscal tears. • Partial meniscectomy is strongly associated with incident osteoarthritis within 1 year. • Partial meniscectomy is associated with increased risk of worsening cartilage damage.

KEYWORDS:

Cartilage loss; MRI; Meniscus; Osteoarthritis; Partial meniscectomy

PMID:
27121931
PMCID:
PMC5083232
DOI:
10.1007/s00330-016-4361-z
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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