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J Gen Intern Med. 2016 Aug;31(8):846-53. doi: 10.1007/s11606-016-3690-6. Epub 2016 Apr 27.

Charting a Key Competency Domain: Understanding Resident Physician Interprofessional Collaboration (IPC) Skills.

Author information

1
Division of General Internal Medicine and Clinical Innovations, New York University School of Medicine, 550 First Avenue, CD401, New York, NY, 10016, USA. Sondra.Zabar@nyumc.org.
2
Division of General Internal Medicine and Clinical Innovations, New York University School of Medicine, 550 First Avenue, CD401, New York, NY, 10016, USA.
3
Institute for Innovations in Medical Education, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Interprofessional collaboration (IPC) is essential for quality care. Understanding residents' level of competence is a critical first step to designing targeted curricula and workplace learning activities. In this needs assessment, we measured residents' IPC competence using specifically designed Objective Structured Clinical Exam (OSCE) cases and surveyed residents regarding training needs.

METHODS:

We developed three cases to capture IPC competence in the context of physician-nurse collaboration. A trained actor played the role of the nurse (Standardized Nurse - SN). The Interprofessional Education Collaborative (IPEC) framework was used to create a ten-item behaviorally anchored IPC performance checklist (scored on a three-point scale: done, partially done, well done) measuring four generic domains: values/ethics; roles/responsibilities; interprofessional communication; and teamwork. Specific skills required for each scenario were also assessed, including teamwork communication (SBAR and CUS) and patient-care-focused tasks. In addition to evaluating IPC skills, the SN assessed communication, history-taking and physical exam skills. IPC scores were computed as percent of items rated well done in each domain (Cronbach's alpha > 0.77). Analyses include item frequencies, comparison of mean domain scores, correlation between IPC and other skills, and content analysis of SN comments and resident training needs.

RESULTS:

One hundred and seventy-eight residents (of 199 total) completed an IPC case and results are reported for the 162 who participated in our medical education research registry. IPC domain scores were: Roles/responsibilities mean = 37 % well done (SD 37 %); Values/ethics mean = 49 % (SD 40 %); Interprofessional communication mean = 27 % (SD 36 %); Teamwork mean = 47 % (SD 29 %). IPC was not significantly correlated with other core clinical skills. SNs' comments focused on respect and IPC as a distinct skill set. Residents described needs for greater clarification of roles and more workplace-based opportunities structured to support interprofessional education/learning.

CONCLUSIONS:

The IPC cases and competence checklist are a practical method for conducting needs assessments and evaluating IPC training/curriculum that provides rich and actionable data at both the individual and program levels.

KEYWORDS:

OSCE; interprofessional collaboration; interprofessional education; medical education

PMID:
27121308
PMCID:
PMC4945565
DOI:
10.1007/s11606-016-3690-6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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