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Am Heart J. 1989 May;117(5):1065-9.

The effect of an unsuccessful subthreshold shock on the energy requirement for the subsequent defibrillation.

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1
Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205.

Abstract

The effect of an unsuccessful subthreshold shock on the energy requirement for the subsequent defibrillation was studied in 10 anesthetized dogs. Defibrillation was achieved with a spring catheter electrode in the superior vena cava and a patch electrode on the anteroapical ventricular wall. Success rates of defibrillation 20 seconds from the onset of ventricular fibrillation were determined at three energy levels with and without a preceding subthreshold shock. Altogether, 637 episodes of fibrillation-defibrillation were performed (63.7 +/- 6.7 per dog). Predicted energy levels for defibrillation success rates of 50% and 80% (E50 and E80) acquired from a logistic regression curve were 0.0303 +/- 0.0064 and 0.0367 +/- 0.0069 joule/gm, respectively, without subthreshold shocks. E50 and E80 with an unsuccessful subthreshold shock resulted in comparable values (E50: 0.0325 +/- 0.0041 joule/gm; E80: 0.0.380 +/- 0.0100 joule/gm). Our results suggest that an unsuccessful low-energy shock does not alter the energy requirement for subsequent defibrillation with an implantable defibrillator.

PMID:
2711966
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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