Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Theriogenology. 2016 Aug;86(3):850-861.e1. doi: 10.1016/j.theriogenology.2016.03.006. Epub 2016 Mar 19.

Alteration of gene expression by zinc oxide nanoparticles or zinc sulfate in vivo and comparison with in vitro data: A harmonious case.

Author information

1
Key Laboratory of Animal Reproduction and Germplasm Enhancement in Universities of Shandong, Qingdao, People's Republic of China; College of Chemistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Qingdao Agricultural University, Qingdao, People's Republic of China.
2
State Key Laboratory of Animal Nutrition, Institute of Animal Sciences, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing, People's Republic of China.
3
College of Chemistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Qingdao Agricultural University, Qingdao, People's Republic of China.
4
Core Laboratories of Qingdao Agricultural University, Qingdao, People's Republic of China.
5
Key Laboratory of Animal Reproduction and Germplasm Enhancement in Universities of Shandong, Qingdao, People's Republic of China.
6
Key Laboratory of Animal Reproduction and Germplasm Enhancement in Universities of Shandong, Qingdao, People's Republic of China. Electronic address: lilan9600@126.com.

Abstract

Granulosa cells (GCs) are those somatic cells closest to the female germ cell. GCs play a vital role in oocyte growth and development, and the oocyte is necessary for multiplication of a species. Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) readily cross biologic barriers to be absorbed into biologic systems that make them promising candidates as food additives. The objective of the present investigation was to explore the impact of intact NPs on gene expression and the functional classification of altered genes in hen GCs in vivo, to compare the data from in vivo and in vitro studies, and finally to point out the adverse effects of ZnO NPs on the reproductive system. After a 24-week treatment, hen GCs were isolated and gene expression was quantified. Intact NPs were found in the ovary and other organs. Zn levels were similar in ZnO-NP-100 mg/kg- and ZnSO4-100 mg/kg-treated hen ovaries. ZnO-NP-100 mg/kg and ZnSO4-100 mg/kg regulated the expression of the same sets of genes, and they also altered the expression of different sets of genes individually. The number of genes altered by the ZnO-NP-100 mg/kg and ZnSO4-100 mg/kg treatments was different. Gene Ontology (GO) functional analysis reported that different results for the two treatments and, in Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) enrichment, 12 pathways (out of the top 20 pathways) in each treatment were different. These results suggested that intact NPs and Zn(2+) had different effects on gene expression in GCs in vivo. In our recent publication, we noted that intact NPs and Zn(2+) differentially altered gene expression in GCs in vitro. However, GO functional classification and KEGG pathway enrichment analyses revealed close similarities for the changed genes in vivo and in vitro after ZnO NP treatment. Furthermore, close similarities were observed for the changed genes after ZnSO4 treatments in vivo and in vitro by GO functional classification and KEGG pathway enrichment analyses. Therefore, the effects of ZnO NPs on gene expression in vitro might represent their effects on gene expression in vivo. The results from this study and our earlier studies support previous findings indicating ZnO NPs promote adverse effects on organisms. Therefore, precautions should be taken when ZnO NPs are used as diet additives for hens because they might cause reproductive issues.

KEYWORDS:

GO analysis; Genes; KEGG enrichment; Ovarian granulosa cells; RNA-seq; Zinc oxide nanoparticles

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center