Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Can J Cardiol. 2016 May;32(5):569-88. doi: 10.1016/j.cjca.2016.02.066. Epub 2016 Mar 10.

Hypertension Canada's 2016 Canadian Hypertension Education Program Guidelines for Blood Pressure Measurement, Diagnosis, Assessment of Risk, Prevention, and Treatment of Hypertension.

Author information

1
Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Electronic address: aacleung@ucalgary.ca.
2
Department of Medicine and Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
3
Divisions of General Internal Medicine, Clinical Epidemiology and Endocrinology, Department of Medicine, McGill University, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
4
Departments of Family Medicine and Community Health Sciences, Institute for Public Health, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
5
Division of General Internal Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
6
Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières, Trois-Rivières, Quebec, Canada.
7
Department of Family Medicine, University of British Columbia, Copeman Healthcare Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
8
Institut de Recherches Cliniques de Montréal, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec, Canada.
9
Department of Medicine, Université Laval, Québec, Quebec, Canada.
10
Ambulatory Internal Medicine Teaching Clinic, St Catharines, Ontario, Canada.
11
CHU-Québec-Hopital St Sacrement, Québec, Quebec, Canada.
12
University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
13
University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
14
Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
15
Hôpital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec, Canada.
16
Discipline of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St John's, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada.
17
Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
18
University of Ottawa Heart Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
19
Department of Medicine and Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research, Jewish General Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
20
Division of Nephrology, St Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
21
University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
22
Departments of Medicine (Division of Endocrinology) and Biochemistry, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada.
23
Vancouver Coastal Health Addiction Services, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
24
Department of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada.
25
Department of Internal Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.
26
Department of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
27
Department of Exercise Science, Concordia University, and Montreal Behavioural Medicine Centre, Hôpital du Sacré-Coeur de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec, Canada.
28
Vancouver Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
29
Division of Endocrinology, St Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
30
Department of Psychology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
31
Division of Clinical Epidemiology, Montreal General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
32
University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
33
Best Practices and Performance, Heart and Stroke Foundation, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
34
Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Hotchkiss Brain Institute, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
35
Departments of Clinical Neurosciences and Radiology, Hotchkiss Brain Institute, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
36
Division of Neurology, Halifax Infirmary, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.
37
Medicine, Community Health Sciences, Physiology and Pharmacology, Libin Cardiovascular Institute of Alberta, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
38
St Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
39
Departments of Medicine and Cardiac Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
40
Charles LeMoyne Hospital Research Centre, Sherbrooke University, Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada.
41
McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
42
Keenan Research Centre in the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute of St Michael's Hospital, and University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
43
University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
44
University Health Network, Departments of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
45
University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.
46
Université de Montréal and CHUM, Montréal, Quebec, Canada.
47
Division of Internal Medicine, McGill University, Montréal, Quebec, Canada.
48
Department of Family Medicine, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada.
49
Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
50
Faculty of Medicine, Université Laval, Québec, Quebec, Canada.
51
Department of Psychology, University of Quebec at Montreal (UQAM), Montréal, Quebec, Canada.
52
Faculté de Médicine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec, Canada.
53
Université de Montréal, Institut de cardiologie de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec, Canada.
54
Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada.
55
The Canadian Stroke Network, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
56
Canadian Forces Health Services, Department of National Defence and Dietitians of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
57
Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, British Columbia.
58
Research Center, Hôpital du Sacré-Coeur de Montréal, Public Health School, University of Montréal, Montréal, Quebec, Canada.
59
University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
60
St George's, University of London, London, United Kingdom.
61
Department of Pediatrics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
62
Service de cardiologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Sainte-Justine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec, Canada.
63
Service de néphrologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Sainte-Justine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec, Canada.
64
Division of Neurology, Department of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
65
Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Québec et Faculté de Pharmacie, Université Laval, Québec, Quebec, Canada.
66
Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
67
Departments of Medicine, Community Health and Cardiac Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.

Abstract

Hypertension Canada's Canadian Hypertension Education Program Guidelines Task Force provides annually updated, evidence-based recommendations to guide the diagnosis, assessment, prevention, and treatment of hypertension. This year, we present 4 new recommendations, as well as revisions to 2 previous recommendations. In the diagnosis and assessment of hypertension, automated office blood pressure, taken without patient-health provider interaction, is now recommended as the preferred method of measuring in-office blood pressure. Also, although a serum lipid panel remains part of the routine laboratory testing for patients with hypertension, fasting and nonfasting collections are now considered acceptable. For individuals with secondary hypertension arising from primary hyperaldosteronism, adrenal vein sampling is recommended for those who are candidates for potential adrenalectomy. With respect to the treatment of hypertension, a new recommendation that has been added is for increasing dietary potassium to reduce blood pressure in those who are not at high risk for hyperkalemia. Furthermore, in selected high-risk patients, intensive blood pressure reduction to a target systolic blood pressure ≤ 120 mm Hg should be considered to decrease the risk of cardiovascular events. Finally, in hypertensive individuals with uncomplicated, stable angina pectoris, either a β-blocker or calcium channel blocker may be considered for initial therapy. The specific evidence and rationale underlying each of these recommendations are discussed. Hypertension Canada's Canadian Hypertension Education Program Guidelines Task Force will continue to provide annual updates.

PMID:
27118291
DOI:
10.1016/j.cjca.2016.02.066
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center