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World J Microbiol Biotechnol. 2016 Jun;32(6):105. doi: 10.1007/s11274-016-2060-1. Epub 2016 Apr 27.

Updates on industrial production of amino acids using Corynebacterium glutamicum.

Author information

1
Genetics of Prokaryotes, Faculty of Biology and Center for Biotechnology (CeBiTec), Bielefeld University, Universitätsstraße 25, 33615, Bielefeld, Germany. volker.wendisch@uni-bielefeld.de.
2
Genetics of Prokaryotes, Faculty of Biology and Center for Biotechnology (CeBiTec), Bielefeld University, Universitätsstraße 25, 33615, Bielefeld, Germany.

Abstract

L-Amino acids find various applications in biotechnology. L-Glutamic acid and its salts are used as flavor enhancers. Other L-amino acids are used as food or feed additives, in parenteral nutrition or as building blocks for the chemical and pharmaceutical industries. L-amino acids are synthesized from precursors of central carbon metabolism. Based on the knowledge of the biochemical pathways microbial fermentation processes of food, feed and pharma amino acids have been developed. Production strains of Corynebacterium glutamicum, which has been used safely for more than 50 years in food biotechnology, and Escherichia coli are constantly improved using metabolic engineering approaches. Research towards new processes is ongoing. Fermentative production of L-amino acids in the million-ton-scale has shaped modern biotechnology and its markets continue to grow steadily. This review focusses on recent achievements in strain development for amino acid production including the use of CRISPRi/dCas9, genome-reduced strains, biosensors and synthetic pathways to enable utilization of alternative carbon sources.

KEYWORDS:

Biosensors; CRISPRi-dCas9; Flexible feedstock concept; GABA; Genome-reduced strains; L-Arginine; L-Citrulline; L-Glutamate; L-Lysine; L-Ornithine; L-Proline

PMID:
27116971
DOI:
10.1007/s11274-016-2060-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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