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Br J Cancer. 2016 May 24;114(11):1265-8. doi: 10.1038/bjc.2016.109. Epub 2016 Apr 26.

Use of tricyclic antidepressants and risk of glioma: a nationwide case-control study.

Author information

1
Clinical Pharmacology, Department of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
2
Centro Español Investigatión Farmacoepidemiológica (CEIFE), Madrid, Spain.
3
Department of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark.
4
Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, Denmark.
5
Department of Neurology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark.
6
Department of Clinical Research, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

A protective effect of tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) against gliomas has been suggested by a small number of studies. We investigated this putative association in a nationwide setting.

METHODS:

Using a case-control design, we identified all patients with histologically verified glioma (cases) in Denmark between 2000 and 2012 and matched these 1 : 20 to population controls. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for glioma associated with long-term (⩾3 years) use of TCAs. Similar analyses were performed for selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs).

RESULTS:

We identified 3767 glioma cases and 75 340 population controls. Long-term use of TCAs was inversely associated with risk of glioma (OR 0.72, 95% CI: 0.41-1.25). Long-term SSRI use was not associated with glioma risk (OR 0.93, 95% CI: 0.75-1.16).

CONCLUSIONS:

Our study indicated that long-term use of TCAs may be associated with a reduced risk of glioma, however, the statistical precision was limited. A similar pattern was not observed for use of SSRIs.

PMID:
27115466
PMCID:
PMC4891498
DOI:
10.1038/bjc.2016.109
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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