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AIDS Behav. 2016 Jul;20(7):1443-50. doi: 10.1007/s10461-016-1407-9.

Attitudes Toward HIV Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis in a United States Urban Clinic Population.

Author information

1
Division of Ambulatory Health Services, Philadelphia Department of Public Health, 500 South Broad Street, Suite 360, Philadelphia, PA, 19146, USA. hkwakwa@aol.com.
2
Division of Ambulatory Health Services, Philadelphia Department of Public Health, 500 South Broad Street, Suite 360, Philadelphia, PA, 19146, USA.
3
AIDS Care Group, Sharon Hill, PA, USA.
4
National Nursing Centers Consortium, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
5
Division of Infectious Diseases, Brown University Alpert School of Medicine, Providence, RI, USA.

Abstract

A majority of US studies on attitudes toward PrEP focus on men who have sex with men with little representation of African Americans. This cross-sectional study seeks to determine openness to PrEP, and examine motivations for openness among Philadelphia residents. Patients undergoing HIV rapid testing between May 2012 and December 2014 in a public setting were administered a survey. Questions included openness to PrEP and reasons for openness to PrEP. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to investigate associations between openness and potential predictors. Analyses were conducted using R version 3.2.4 and the epitools and car packages. Of 5606 respondents, over 90 % were African American. Men were more likely to express openness (61.4 % of men, 54.8 % of women, p < 0.0001). Predictors of openness were younger age, black race, higher perceived risk for HIV by patient or as assessed by Tester, intermittent /no condom use, greater number of partners in 12 months and previous HIV testing. The main reason for openness was fear of HIV, and for disinterest was lack of recognition of risk. Understanding openness to PrEP, and reasons for openness to or disinterest in PrEP are critical to determining the best approaches to facilitate engagement in PrEP care by communities and persons at elevated risk for HIV acquisition. Further study is needed on how best to manage disinterest in PrEP by those at high risk for HIV, and how openness to PrEP translates into concrete steps to take PrEP.

KEYWORDS:

Attitudes; HIV; PrEP; US; Urban

PMID:
27115399
DOI:
10.1007/s10461-016-1407-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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